The Catholic University of America

Leadership Council of Catholic Laity

An inventory of the Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL)/American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN) Papers at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives


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Mailing Address: The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064

Telephone: 202-319-5065

Email: lib-archives@cua.edu

URL: http://archives.lib.cua.edu/

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Descriptive Summary

Repository: The American Catholic Research Center and University Archives
Creator: Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL)/American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN)
Title: Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL)/American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN) Papers
Dates: 1972(1986-1995)1996
Extent: 4 linear feet; 9 boxes
Abstract: The Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL) originated with the American bishops' Committee on the Laity Consultation in Belleville, Illinois, prior to the Synod on the laity of 1987. It continued thereafter as a tax exempt non-profit organization until it was dissolved in 1995 with its remaining assets distributed to its member organizations. The American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN) was a national Catholic organization that began in 1985 as a project of the Center of Concern in Washington, D.C. It was re-named the ACLN the following year and incorporated as a tax exempt non-profit organization that was officially terminated in 1990 with its assets transferred to the LCCL. Records housed at CUA were gathered primarily by Fred C. Leone and Joseph Holland who were members of both the LCCL and ACLN. They include correspondence, meeting minutes, articles of incorporation, financial records, publications such as newsletters and directories, and conference programs as well as video tapes and audio cassettes.
Collection Number: 160
Language: English

Historical Note

The appropriate role of the laity within the worldwide Roman Catholic Church has bedeviled its members for much of its recent history. The roots of the Roman Catholic laity in the United States of America, a group referred to as 'The Faithful" in a recent seminal book by historian James O'Toole, goes back to the European colonization beginning in the fifteenth century with Spanish missions in regions such as Florida and the deep south, California and the west coast, and New Mexico and the southwest. The French came later, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, with missions in areas that now include Louisiana, Missouri, Illinois, and Michigan. The English, who also came in the seventeenth century, established colonies on the eastern seaboard stretching from New England to Georgia. Their established churches were not Catholic, though Maryland, founded in the 1630s, was the first to tolerate Catholics, although this situation later changed. In fact, it was only in Pennsylvania, founded by the Quaker sect in the 1680s, that Catholics were never officially persecuted. These Catholics of mostly English background generally lived in small and isolated communities and only numbered a modest one percent of the population on the eve of the American Revolution. They practiced their religion as they were able with the occasional help of itinerant priests until a more orderly church of both laity and clerics developed, with the first American bishop, John Carroll of Baltimore, being appointed in 1789. As the nineteenth century progressed, standardized discipline in the American Church was advanced by the convocation of the plenary councils of Baltimore that resulted in the promulgation of the Baltimore Catechism and the establishment of The Catholic University of America.

In the decades before the American Civil War, and continuing thereafter, the numbers of Catholic immigrants, mostly Irish and German, to the United States increased. As they assimilated and became more established, they became eager to emulate the types of charity work being done by their Protestant countrymen. This included such activities as temperance, poor relief, and resettlement by the founding of organizations such as the Ancient Order of Hibernians in NYC in 1836 and the establishment of wings of such existing groups as the Society of St. Vincent de Paul in 1845. Catholics also wanted to show that while much Protestant charity, in their view, came from upper class largesse, Catholic efforts were the result of working class sacrifices inspired by faith in time tested papal encyclicals and other old world values. They were, however, desirous to be accepted by American society and to demonstrate that Catholics were not largely foreign and intemperate paupers. They took part in the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago, Illinois, with a Columbian Exposition designed to demonstrate the Catholic place in American history (after all America was 'discovered' by the Catholic explorer Christopher Columbus). These lay Catholics efforts also took place at a time when internal conflicts arose among ethnic groups like the Irish and the Germans while new waves of immigrants, primarily Italians and Poles, from southern and Eastern Europe respectively fomented renewed anti-Catholic sentiments among non-Catholic Americans. There was also the Vatican suspicion about American ideas in the Church that resulted in the 1899 condemnation of 'Americanism.' It is not surprising then that the Vatican had special concerns about the United States and formally considered it a mission country until 1908.

As the twentieth century dawned there were increasing efforts at national Catholic unity and a greater role for the laity. This is evidenced by the organization of the American Federation of Catholic Societies in 1901, the Daughters of Isabella (later the Catholic Daughters of America) in 1903, the Catholic Education Association (later the National Catholic Education Association) in 1904, and the National Conference of Catholic Charities (later Catholic Charities USA) in 1910. This trend continued after the outbreak of the First World War, with Catholic leaders, hoping to demonstrate Catholic loyalty, created the National Catholic War Council (NCWC) in 1917, an emergency organization based in Washington, D.C., representing Catholic interests by addressing the needs of soldiers at home and overseas, promoting the Americanization of recent immigrants, and developing a Program for the Social Reconstruction of American society. After the end of hostilities, the War Council was succeeded by the National Catholic Welfare Council (known since 2001 as the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops) which was composed of the American hierarchy and its standing secretariat. Thereafter, the NCWC blossomed into the single most important national organization in the American Catholic Church through the middle years of the twentieth century. It became the principal lobbying arm for Catholics with the federal government, initially fighting against federal aid to education bills for fear such laws would impose government controls on private schools though later it would fight for funding for parochial schools. The NCWC issued national guidelines and provided training and national coordination for hosts of local Catholic societies.

This was especially true for the Lay Organizations Department that oversaw the activities of the fledgling National Council of Catholic Men (NCCM) and National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW). It served as a channel for the interchange of information and service between the bishops and the laity in their common Church work, especially in promoting Catholic principles and ideals in education, social and civic life. The NCCM was a federation of Catholic men's groups that operated through a committee system on national, diocesan, and parish levels. They operated a New York radio and television office from which The Catholic Hour was produced 1929-1968. The NCCW was a breakthrough for Catholic lay women which coincided with the winning of suffrage for American women. They operated as a federation of Catholic women's organization through a system of national committees having counterparts on the diocesan and parish level. These committees included Immigration, Social Action, and Rural Life. They also held national conventions, assemblies, and regional training. The National Council of Catholic Laity (NCCL) was a brief union of the NCCM and NCCW arising out of celebrations of their joint fiftieth anniversaries in 1970. A joint committee had recommended the merger as a way to promote greater lay unity but the short lived organization went defunct when the NCCM folded in 1975 and the NCCW went its own way thereafter.

By the mid twentieth century it was clear that the church was moving toward modernism despite past efforts against it. This could be seen with theologians such as Karl Rahner and John Courtney Murray who wanted to integrate modern living with timeless church principles while others such as Yves Congar and Joseph Ratzinger sought an accurate understanding of scripture as a source of renewal. The Church also faced great challenges with increasing social, economic, and technological change. Therefore, Pope John XXIII convened a Second Vatican Council, 1962-1965, (the first one was in 1869-1870 and left much work unfinished) to address these various issues with resulting significant changes in ecclesiology, liturgy, and scripture and divine revelation. In America, this led to the creation of such lay entities such as the Advisory Council to the Administrative Board of U.S. Bishops, a post Vatican II phenomenon that reflected a new vision of the Church as a community of the 'people of God' and not just a hierarchical structure. There was a focus on the shared responsibility of bishops and laity alike in conducting the pastoral affairs of the Church. A major undertaking of the Advisory Council was to study the possibility of creating a National Pastoral Council though it was eventually decided not to be feasible. The Council was influential in other areas though as it had a role in shaping decisions that led to the establishment of the Campaign for Human Development, the Bicentennial Conference on Liberty and Justice, and a greater concern for minority groups.

The American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN) was a national Catholic membership organization that began in 1985 as the Lay Project of the Jesuit Center of Concern in Washington, D.C. It was re-named the ACLN the following year and incorporated as a tax exempt non-profit organization based at St. Paul's College in Washington, D.C. The ACLN held two national organizing meetings, one in Indianapolis in 1985 and another in San Antonio in 1987, as well as co-hosting the 1987 synod on the laity in Rome, Italy. The ACLN had built up a membership of 5,000 by 1988 when the Executive Committee decided, and publicly announced, that because of a combination of outstanding debts and declining income they were suspending all program activities, including the publication of their bi-monthly newspaper Gathering. Two of the most prominent ACLN officials were President Fred C. Leone and Board member Joseph Holland. These two with one other remaining board member, Louis Fischer, decided in 1990 to officially terminate the organization. In a memo dated December 5, 1990 they stated that the action was taken at that time because ACLN had been dormant for almost three years, with no paid employees since January 1988, and also because all financial obligations, especially to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), had been cleared up. It was also decided to transfer any remaining balance to the Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL), another non-profit organization whose mission and goals were consistent with those of ACLN, and of which both Leone and Holland were members.

The impetus for the organizing of the Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL) originated with the National Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee on the Laity Consultation in Belleville, Illinois, prior to the synod on the laity of 1987. The LCCL continued thereafter and was incorporated in the state of Delaware as a tax exempt non-profit organization in 1989. Organization members included the Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA), the Catholic Worker, Cursillo, The Grail, the National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW), and the National Office of Black Catholics (NOBC). Among the affiliated organizations were the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR), the National Catholic Education Association (NCEA), and Pax Christi. Many individual members were from the former ACLN and other active or defunct lay groups. Annual conferences were held from 1989 to 1994, with the first of these again in Belleville, and later ones in Chicago and Atlanta. Conference themes included such titles as 'Spirituality and Ecology: Values in Harmony-Values in Conflict' and 'Multiculturalism and Racism: Fragmentation or Solidarity.' The one scheduled for 1995 with a theme titled 'Towards a Healthy Adult Church' was cancelled. In March 1995, the LCCL's governing body, the Leadership Team, that include Fred Leone and Joe Holland, met in Chicago to determine if the LCCL should continue in its present form, change its structure, or dissolve. After consulting the membership, it was decided in a meeting in May 1995 to dissolve the corporation and distribute its remaining assets to tax exempt member organizations for ongoing and future projects. Among the various reasons stated for the demise perhaps the most important was a feeling among the membership that the LCCL had not addressed issues of interest to people in the pew. In a memo dated January 8, 1996, Mr. Leone stated that he had just filed the final papers with the IRS concluding the LCCL's existence.

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Scope and Contents

This collection consists primarily of material from the Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCL) and the American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN). In addition, there are some papers from other affiliate lay groups such as the National Federation of Christian Life Communities, the World Federation of Christian Life Communities, and the Men's Club of Nativity Parish. Finally, there is a very small amount of miscellaneous material. The bulk of this collection was either generated or collected by long time official of these various organizations, Fred C. Leone, and, to a lesser extent, his colleague Joseph Holland. Dr. Leone was the hub of activity from his home base in Silver Spring, Maryland, though there were many other members, such as Dr. Holland, who were active from further afar as well. The collection has been divided according to the organization, plus the miscellaneous material, into an arrangement of six series including several sub-series each for the ACLN and LCCL.

The first series is Leadership Council of Catholic Laity, 1972(1988-1995)1996, in Boxes 1-6. The records from this organization have been further subdivided into eight sub-series. The first sub-series has the articles of incorporation and By-Laws from 1989 that include correspondence with an attorney relating to certifying the LCCL in the state of Delaware. The second sub-series is pre NCCL lay movements which has notes and reports on the meetings of national lay movements in Erlanger, Kentucky, in 1972, and Clarkston, Michigan, in 1973, as well as a meeting of the Consultation of National Lay Movements for the Synod on the Vocation and Mission of the Laity in March of 1987. The third sub-series contains meeting minutes and reports, plus attending memos, for 1989-1995, from various groups including the planning committee, steering committee, and the leadership team. The fourth sub-series is general correspondence, filed chronologically, for 1989-1996. The fifth sub-series has the subject files, 1988-1994, with material on conferences, membership, the Raskob Foundation, and Anton J. Eichmuller. The sixth sub-series is made up of financial records, 1988-1994 consisting of financial reports, bank statements, check stubs, and correspondence with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The seventh sub-series is publications, 1989-1995, that includes copies of directories, publicity material, and the LCCL newsletter. The eighth and final sub-series is multi-media material, 1993 and undated, including VHS tapes and floppy disks.

The second series is the American Catholic Lay Network, 1984(1986-1990)1990, in Boxes 6-9. This was the immediate predecessor to the Leadership Council of Catholic Laity, with many of the same officers. This material is organized into six sub-series. The first sub-series is a file of organizational documentation from 1986-1990. The second sub-series has meeting minutes and reports, 1986-1988, from the interim planning committee, board of directors, executive committee, and the National Leadership Council. The third sub-series is chronological correspondence from 1986-1988. The fourth sub-series has subject files, with some material dated as early as 1980 but mostly for 1985-1986. There are files on various bishops such as Bernadin and Weakland as well as organizations like the Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM) and Leadership Council of Women Religious (LCWR). The fifth sub-series is financial records for 1986-1992 with financial reports, banking records, bills and receipts, and federal and state tax records and correspondence. The sixth sub-series is publications, 1986-1988, that include an annual report from 1986 as well as publicity material and press releases.

The third series is the National Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1985-1990, in Box 9. This is a small grouping of meeting minutes, correspondence, and membership directories. The last is a mix of hand written, typescript, and printed formats. Fred Leone was member of the Whisper of God Community of the DC Metro Area and the Vice President for Finance, at least for 1987-1988.

The fourth series is the World Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1982, in Box 9. This consists of one folder with a typescript list of international delegates to a meeting and two copies of a group black and white photograph, presumably of said delegates.

The fifth series is the Men's Club of Nativity Parish, undated in Box 9. This is one folder with a draft constitution and by-laws.

The sixth and final series is Miscellaneous, 1990, also in Box 9. This has a random letter from Mr. Leone and an unrelated resume received from another party.

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Arrangement

The Leadership Council of Catholic Laity/American Catholic Lay Network collection consists of six series:







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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

There were no restrictions placed on this collection at the time of accession, but during processing it was discovered that access to sections of the financial records of the ACLN must be restricted, due to sensitive personal financial information.

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Administrative Information

Acquisition Information

The collection was donated in 1996 by Dr. Fred C. Leone of Silver Spring, Maryland. He had previously served as a member of the leadership teams and Treasurer of both the ACLN and the LCCL as well as serving for a time as President of the LCCL. The bulk of the papers are from Dr. Leone's files, but some were also gathered from other leadership team members, in particular, Dr. Joseph Holland. Dr. Leone and Dr. Holland approached the University Archives to donate their records pertaining to the LCCL/ACLN and placed no restrictions on access. In the course of processing the collection, the archives staff has found it prudent to restrict access to the tax and employment records of the ACLN, since these records contain sensitive personal financial information. It was also discovered during the processing of this collection that it contained some materials from lay organizations in which Dr. Leone participated during the 1980's and 1990's, and these were retained as separate series within the collection.

Processing Information

 

Processing completed in November 2010 by Matthew T. Allman. EAD markup completed in November 2010 by Matthew T. Allman, with revisions by William John Shepherd in January 2011.

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Related Material

Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA)

Catholic Daughters of the Americas - District of Columbia Court

Daughters of Isabella

International Federation of Catholic Alumnae (IFCA)

National Council of Catholic Laity (NCCL)

National Council of Catholic Men (NCCM)

National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW)

Society of St. Vincent de Paul (SSVP), National Council of the Archdiocese of Washington

Society of St. Vincent de Paul (SSVP), National Council of the United States

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Index Terms

This record series is indexed under the following controlled access subject terms.


Persons:
Bernadin, Joseph
Eichmuller, Anton J.
Hickey, James A.
Holland, Joseph
Kramer, Mary Ann
Leone, Fred C.
Ott, Stanley J.
Rinaldi, Grace
Weakland, Rembert G.

Organizations:
American Catholic Lay Network (ACLN)
Catholic Daughters of the Americas (CDA)
Center of Concern
Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM)
Leadership Conference of Woman Religious (LCWR)
Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (LCCN)
National Catholic Education Association (NCEA)
National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB)
National Council of Catholic Women (NCCW)

Places:
Atlanta, Georgia
Belleville, Illinois
Chicago, Illinois
Indianapolis, Indiana
Rome, Italy
San Antonio, Texas
Silver Spring, Maryland
Washington, D.C.
Wilmington, Delaware

Subjects:
Ecology
Laity-Catholic Church
Multi-Culturalism
Pro Life Movement
Tax Exemption


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Select Bibliography

Hennesey, James. S.J. American Catholics: A History of the Roman Catholic Community in the United States. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981

 

O'Toole, James M. The Faithful: A History of Catholics in America. Cambridge, Massachusetts and London, England: Harvard University Press, 2008.

 

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Detailed Description of the Collection

                       
Series 1: Leadership Council of Catholic Laity, 1972(1988-1995)1996, (6 Boxes)
The records from this organization have been divided into eight sub-series.
Sub-series 1.1: Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws, 1989, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
1 1 Articles of Incorporation and By-Laws, 1989
Sub-series 1.2: Pre-LCCL Meetings of National Lay Movements, 1972-1973, 1987, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
1 2 Pre-LCCL Meetings of National Lay Movements, 1972-1973, 1987
Sub-series 1.3: Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1989-1995, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
1 3 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1988
  4 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1989
  5 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1989
  6 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1990
  7 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1991
  8 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1992
  9 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1993
  10 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1994
Box Folder
2 1 Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1995
Sub-series 1.4: Correspondence, 1989-1996, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
2 2 Correspondence, 1989
  3 Correspondence, 1990
  4 Correspondence, 1990
  5 Correspondence, 1990
  6 Correspondence, 1991
  7 Correspondence, 1992
  8 Correspondence, 1992
Box Folder
3 1 Correspondence, 1993
  2 Correspondence, 1994
  3 Correspondence, 1995
  4 Correspondence, 1995
  5 Correspondence, 1996
Sub-series 1.5: Subject Files, 1988-1994, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
3 6 LCCL Conference III, 1991
  7 LCCL Conference V, 1992-1993
  8 LCCL Conference VI, 1993-1994
  9 Membership Applications/Renewals, 1990-1994
  10 Raskob, 1988-1991
Box Folder
4 1 Anton J. Eichmuller, 1992-1993
Sub-series 1.6: Financial Records, 1988-1995, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
4 2 Unaudited Financial Statements, 1988-1989
  3 Unaudited Financial Statements, 1989-1995
  4 Financial Reports, 1989-1995
  5 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1988
  6 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1989
  7 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1990
  8 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1991
Box Folder
5 1 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1992
  2 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1993
  3 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1994
  4 Vouchers and Bank Statements, 1995
  5 Check Stubs, 1988-1995
  6 IRS Correspondence, 1989-1991
  7 IRS Correspondence, 1992-1995
Sub-series 1.7: Publications, 1989-1995, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
5 8 Directories, 1991-1993
  9 Publicity Materials, 1991-1995
Box Folder
6 1 Leadership Council of Catholic Laity (Newsletter), 1989-1993
  2 A Catholic Dialogue on Ecological Affairs and African Spiritualities, 1993
Sub-series 1.8: Multimedia Material, 1993,n.d., (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
6 3 VHS Tapes, 1993
  4 Audio Cassette, 1993
  5 Floppy Disks, n.d.
                       
Series 2: American Catholic Lay Network, 1984(1986-1990)1990, (4 Boxes)
The records from this organization have been divided into six sub-series.
Sub-series 2.1: Organizational Documentation, 1986-1990, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
6 6 Organizational Documentation, 1986-1990
Sub-series 2.2: Meeting Minutes and Reports, 1986-1988, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
6 7 Interim Planning Committee, 1986-1987
  8 Board of Directors, 1987-1988
  9 Executive Committee, 1987-1988
  10 National Leadership Council, 1987
Sub-series 2.3: Correspondence, 1986-1988, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
7 1 Correspondence, 1986
  2 Correspondence, 1987
  3 Correspondence, 1988
  4 Correspondence, 1988
Sub-series 2.4: Subject Files, 1980(1985-1986)n.d., (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
7 5 Bishops: Bishops Committee on the Laity, 1985-1986
  6 Bishops: Bishop Correspondence, 7/1984-6/1985
  7 Bishops: Bishop Correspondence, 7/1985-6/1986
  8 Bishops: Bishop Correspondence, 1986
  9 Bishops: Bishops Correspondence, 7/1987
  10 Bishops: Bishop's Letter, 1985
  11 Bishops: Provincials Letter, n.d.
  12 Bishops: Bishops' Pastorals, 1980-1985
  13 Bishops: Bishop Stanley J. Ott, 1985
  14 Bishops: Archbishop Rembert G. Weakland, 1985-1987
  15 Bishops: Archbishop James A. Hickey, 1987
  16 Bishops: Joseph Cardinal Bernardin, 1985-1987
  17 Bishops: Episcopal Advisory Board, 1986-1987
  18 Bishops: Bishops Lists, 1985
Box Folder
8 1 Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM) Correspondence, 1985-1986
  2 Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM) Lists, 1985
  3 Conference of Major Superiors of Men (CMSM) Provincials Letter, n.d.
  4 Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) Lists, 1985
  5 Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) Correspondence, 1985-1986
Sub-series 2.5: Financial Records, 1986-1992, (2 Boxes)
 
Box Folder
8 6 General Records and Reports, 1986-1988
  7 Federal Tax Records and Correspondence, 1987-1988
  8 Federal Tax Records and Correspondence, 1989
  9 Federal Tax Records and Correspondence, 1989
  10 Federal Tax Records and Correspondence, 1990-1992
  11 District of Columbia Tax Records (RESTRICTED), 1986-1989
  12 Virginia Department of Taxation, 1987-1988
Box Folder
9 1 Banking Records, 1988-1990
  2 Bills and Receipts, 1986-1988
  3 Bills and Receipts, 1987-1989
Sub-series 2.6: Publications, 1986-1988, (1 Box)
 
Box Folder
9 4 Annual Report, 1986
  5 Gathering, 1986-1987
  6 Lay Spirituality Series, 1986-1987
  7 Publicity Materials and Press Releases, n.d.-1988
                       
Series 3: National Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1985-1990 (1 Box)
Minutes, correspondence, and directories.
Box Folder
9 8 Meeting Minutes, 1987-1989
  9 Correspondence, 1986-1990
  10 Member Directories, 1985-1987
                       
Series 4: World Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1982 (1 Box)
List of delegates to a meeting and a black and white photograph presumably of said delegates.
Box Folder
9 11 List of Delegates and Photograph, 1982
                       
Series 5: Men's Club of Nativity Parish, n.d. (1 Box)
One typescript copy of a draft constitution and bylaws.
Box Folder
9 12 Constitution and By-Laws, n.d.
                       
Series 6: Miscellaneous, 1990 (1 box)
A random typewritten letter from Mr. Leone and a resume received by him.
Box Folder
9 13 Personal Letter and Resume, 1990

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Historical Note

Scope and Contents

Arrangement

Restrictions

Administrative Information

Related Material

Index Terms

Select Bibliography

Detailed Description of the Collection

Series 1: Leadership Council of Catholic Laity, 1972(1988-1995)1996,

Series 2: American Catholic Lay Network, 1984(1986-1990)1990,

Series 3: National Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1985-1990

Series 4: World Federation of Christian Life Communities, 1982

Series 5: Men's Club of Nativity Parish, n.d.

Series 6: Miscellaneous, 1990

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