The Catholic University of America

Terence Vincent Powderly

An inventory of the Terence Vincent Powderly Papers at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives


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Descriptive Summary

Repository: The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives
Creator: Terence Vincent Powderly, 1849-1924
Title: The Papers of Terence Vincent Powderly
Dates: 1864-1938
Extent: 165 linear feet; 264 boxes, 1 file cabinet
Abstract: The papers of Terence Vincent Powderly aptly demonstrate his mark on American labor and immigration history. They consist largely of his official correspondence as General Master Workman of the Knights of Labor, 1879-1893, as well as his tenure as an official for both the Immigration and Labor departments, 1898-1924, and Mayor of Scranton, 1878-1884. In addition, there are photographs, memorabilia, personal correspondence, and legal and financial records.
Collection Number: ACUA 002
Language: English

Biographical Note

Terence Vincent Powderly was the eloquent though flawed personification of the American Labor movement during the late 19th century, specifically during his tenure, 1879-1893, as head of the fledgling Knights of Labor union that became the largest organization of American workers in the 19th century. He was a major celebrity who captured national attention. He was also a dedicated public servant, on both the local and federal levels, with three terms as a progressive mayor of Scranton, 1878-1884, and a reform minded career in Washington, D.C., as a bureaucrat with the U.S. Bureau of Immigration, 1897-1902 and 1906-1921, as well as the U.S. Department of Labor, 1921-1924. He was also a strong supporter of Irish nationalism, serving as a member of Clan Na Gael, a secret society committed to Irish independence, and the Irish Land League, a political organization that sought to abolish Irish landlordism in favor of tenant farmers.

Terence Vincent Powderly, a child of the Anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania, was born 22 January 1849 in the industrial community of Carbondale to Irish immigrants Terence and Madge (Walsh) Powderly. According to his son, Terence Sr. had said "Let us leave this damn country and go to America where a man may own himself and a gun too, if he wants to." The newly wedded couple left County Meath in 1827, landed in Montreal, and lived a few years in Ogdensburg, New York, where Terence Sr. worked on a farm. In 1829, the family relocated to Carbondale, where the elder Powderly worked as a coal miner. He was successful enough to open his own mine in 1845, though it went under by 1858, when he was forced to secure employment as a mechanic with the Delaware and Hudson Railroad.

With seven brothers and four sisters young Terence had scant opportunity for more than a rudimentary education. He was employed at age 13 as a switchman for the Delaware and Hudson Railroad. He then apprenticed for three years, 1866-1869, as a machinist to James Dickson, a master mechanic who had in turn apprenticed under the Englishman, George Stephenson, the inventor of the steam locomotive and thus the modern railroad. After completing his apprenticeship, Powderly was out of work temporarily, though he was then employed for the next four years in the machine shops of the Pennsylvania Coal Company and the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Powderly later stated that the strike and subsequent mine fire in Avondale, Pennsylvania, in September 1869, that killed 110 coal miners, were major influences in his life. Resolved to do what he could to help his fellow workers, he joined the International Union of Machinists and Blacksmiths in 1871. He also read widely and impressed people with both his writing and speaking abilities. As a result, he was elected both local president and corresponding secretary of this union in 1872.

His union activities and the Depression of 1873 left him jobless and blacklisted as a union agitator. Over the next two years, he was repeatedly unemployed and traveled throughout the Midwest and Canada searching for work. He was often separated from his extended family and wife, Hannah (nee Dever), who he had married in 1872, and became depressed. He finally returned to employment in Scranton in 1875, but had his wages cut the next year, and in 1877 was discharged once more, never to work as a machinist again. He was also involved in a personal tragedy in 1875 when his wife, who he refers to in his diary as "my little darling," almost died when she delivered their only known child, a daughter who passed a few days later. Her grieving father "took the baby to the grave yard…and buried it."

Powderly had joined the Scranton, Local Assembly #88 of the Order of the Knights of Labor in 1876 while he was still employed as a machinist, though he had actually been sworn in to the Knights while in Philadelphia in 1874. He organized them into an assembly in Scranton and became their leader with the title of Master Workman. Rising steadily, he became Corresponding Secretary of District Assembly No. 5 in 1877, and assumed the national leadership as Grand (later General) Master Workman in 1879. The Knights came into national prominence during Powderly's tenure, peaking in national membership and influence in 1886 with nearly 700,000 predominantly Catholic members. He was popular as people greeted him with cheers when he traveled, wrote songs and poetry about him, and even named their children after him. Unfortunately, he also came under increasing assault from various political, economic, and religious interests. His grand and idealistic rhetoric and devotion to workers' rights were often belied by his instinctive caution and desire to avoid open conflict.

The Knights soon went into decline. They were linked to a bombing in Chicago during a workers rally in that city's Haymarket Square and the abortive Southwest Railroad Strike of 1886 caused greater division and resentment against Powderly since he had called off the strike. Finally, the founding of the American Federation of Labor (AFL) by Samuel Gompers, also in 1886, lured workers away so that by 1889 membership had dropped to 120,000. Thereafter, the Knights were beset with a divisive power struggle resulting in Powderly's removal in 1893 and eventual succession by his protégé and betrayer, John William Hayes. Perhaps Powderly's greatest achievement, greatly aided by Cardinal James Gibbons of Baltimore, was to bring about reconciliation in 1888 between the labor movement and the Roman Catholic Church that had hitherto distrusted and disapproved of labor organizations due to their secretive and ritualistic activities. This action, which included recognition by the Vatican, resulted in a virtual alliance between the Church and the American labor movement that lasted well into the next century.

In addition to his labor connections, Powderly was active in local Pennsylvania politics. In the 1876 U.S. presidential election, he supported the Greenback ticket, a largely agrarian reaction following the economic depression of 1873 in opposition to federal government's currency policies. In the wake of the massive railroad strikes of 1877, political activism surged through the labor movement resulting in the organization of a Labor Party that partnered with the Greenbacks to make Powderly Mayor of Scranton. During his three term tenure of 1878 to 1884 he progressively worked to transform Scranton, which had been incorporated as a borough in 1856 and only chartered as a city in 1866, into a model and modern municipality. He did this by advancing and largely accomplishing an agenda that included, among other things, the establishment of a board of health and a municipal sewage system as well as signing a bill reforming the city's tax structure. He also worked for paved roads and legislation against adulterated foods and for a meat inspector.

After being forced from the Knights in 1893 he was unable to find employment as his former labor connection led to him being viewed as a potential troublemaker in the workplace. Some advised him to go into the saloon business but instead he studied law. He was admitted to the Pennsylvania Bar in 1894 and eventually argued before both the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania and the Supreme Court of the United States. Unfortunately, he became convinced that the administration of justice was hindered by bias and technicalities. He also returned to politics, and having previously been soured on third party infighting and electoral prospects, become a member of the Central Republican Club of Scranton. Shortly thereafter, in the contentious presidential election of 1896, he advanced his own ambitions by avidly campaigning for the successful Republican ticket of William McKinley of Ohio and Garrett Hobart of New Jersey.

In 1897, the newly inaugurated President William McKinley appointed Powderly as Commissioner General of Immigration, a significant office under the U.S. Treasury Department. After a lengthy Senate confirmation battle, Powderly assumed his position March 1898 and for most of his tenure reported to Lyman Gage (1836-1927), a sound conservative businessman, as well as also serving briefly under the former Governor of Iowa, Leslie M. Shaw (1848-1932). As Commissioner-General of Immigration, Powderly created a commission to investigate conditions at Ellis Island that resulted in charges of corruption and nearly a dozen firings. Unfortunately for Powderly, his benefactor, William McKinley, was assassinated in September 1901 and succeeded by the brilliant and energetic Theodore Roosevelt of New York. The new president terminated Powderly from office on July 2, 1902. This action resulted from the slanderous efforts of some of those previously fired at Ellis Island, headed by Edward F. McSweeney, former Assistant Commissioner of Immigration of the Port of New York. They managed to convince Roosevelt that Powderly was himself corrupt and had actively conspired with Roosevelt's political enemy Thomas Platt. Powderly, however, did not go down without a fight and waged a vigorous campaign to exonerate himself before both the new President and the nation at large.

Following an investigation, Roosevelt realized that accusations against Powderly were baseless and reinstated him in 1906 as a Special Immigration Inspector. This position made Powderly a special representative of the Department of Commerce and Labor with the charge to study the causes of emigration from Europe to America. He traveled to Great Britain, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy, and Austria-Hungary. His report advocated that U.S. Immigration agents should be sent to Europe to select prospective immigrants before they left their homes, travel with them on the ships bringing them over, and immigrants be more evenly distributed throughout the country once they were here. Powderly next served, 1907-1921, as Chief of the Immigration bureau's Division of Information. Until 1913, a period that ran from the latter part of the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt through that of Republican William Howard Taft, the Division of Information was part of the Immigration and Naturalization Bureau of the Department of Commerce and Labor. The bureau was headed until 1908 by Frank Sargent, the Vermonter who had replaced Powderly in 1902, and then by the Illinois born former International Longshoreman's Association President Daniel Keefe, 1909-1913. The Commerce and Labor secretaries were first, 1906-1909, the German-Jewish born Oscar Straus and then, 1909-1913, the Texas born founder of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Charles Nagel.

The advent of the Democratic administration of Woodrow Wilson following the contentious election of 1912 saw the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization divided into separate bureaus of Immigration and Naturalization, with both placed in the new Department of Labor. For the next eight years, Powderly reported to Commissioner-General Anthony Camenetti (1854-1923), a former lawyer and Congressman from California who argued that Asian immigration, particularly from China and Japan, was a menace that should be formally ended by Congress. Powderly also had occasion to work with Camenetti's boss, William B. Wilson (1870-1934), the Scottish born first Secretary of Labor, who had been a member of the Knights of Labor and also a founding member of the United Mine Workers of America (UMWA). Wilson went on to be a Congressional Representative from Pennsylvania, 1907-1913, where he sponsored an investigation of mining safety conditions and helped organize the Federal Bureau of Mines in 1910. He also promoted the eight-hour workday for public employees, anti-injunction legislation, the establishment of the Children's Bureau, and the creation of the Department of Labor, which he headed, 1913-1921. His work there involved developing agencies for industrial mediation and forming the United States Employment Service to handle work issues during World War I, 1917-1918.

During these years Powderly was also able to keep in close contact with important leaders of the labor movement. He was especially close to Mary 'Mother' Harris Jones (ca. 1836-1930), the Irish born rabble rouser and 'Miner's Angel' who was an active participant in the front line's of the American labor movement for nearly sixty years. Affiliated with both the Knights of Labor and the UMWA, she also led the famous Children Textile Workers March from Philadelphia to Teddy Roosevelt's home in Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York in 1902. She was often photographed with Powderly and was his frequent houseguest (he also paid many of her bills). Another labor comrade of Powderly's was John B. White (1870-1934), Illinois born coal miner and progressive president of the UMWA from 1911 to 1917. It was during his presidency that the Colorado Coal Strike of 1913-1914, including the infamous Ludlow Massacre, which also involved 'Mother' Jones, occurred. He secured UMWA approval of a ban on the employment of children under 16, old age pensions, and workmen's compensation. He is also notable for appointing John L. Lewis as the UMWA's chief statistician, a launching point for Lewis historic tenure as UMWA President from 1920 to 1960.

Powderly's final position, 1921-1924, was as Commissioner of Conciliation of the U.S. Labor Department under James J. Davis (1873-1947), 'The Iron Puddler' and 'Puddler Jim,' the Welsh born steel worker from Pittsburgh who served as U.S. Secretary of Labor, 1921-1930, under Republican presidents Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover, before going on to serve as a senator from Pennsylvania. Davis was notable for establishing the U.S. Border Patrol and proposing immigration quotas. Powderly died in Washington, DC, on 24 June 1924. American labor historians have dismissed Powderly and the Knights as relics of the utopian traditions of the antebellum years which were unsuited to the economic realities of the Gilded Age, especially in comparison with the rival American Federation of Labor (AFL) with its more apolitical craft unionism. Powderly was charged with being sensitive, vain, naïve, and a "windbag" according to mid twentieth century historian Norman Ware. Recent studies of the Knights, especially by Craig Phelan, have transformed the view of them into that of an authentic working-class organization with a convincing critique of industrial capitalism. This has helped make the case that Powderly was a worthy if somewhat flawed hero who articulated the collective progressive vision of the working masses in the face of the inhumanity of the industrial capitalist system. In 1999, Powderly was honored as an inductee into the United States Department of Labor's Hall of Fame in Washington, D.C., joining figures such as rival Samuel Gompers, friend Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, and fellow Pennsylvanian labor leader Philip Murray. A fair and comprehensive biography encompassing his full career, especially his later years, is still awaited.

Powderly was often photographed, or had photographs given to him, throughout his long life and varied career, and over 300 of these, dated from about 1865 to 1922, survive as part of his collection of papers at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives of The Catholic University of America (CUA) in northeast Washington. Additionally, by the turn of the twentieth century, Powderly himself had become an avid and skilled photographer, with several thousand taken by him, dating from about 1902 to 1921 and including over 900 relating to Washington, D.C., also preserved as part of his aforementioned collection. Overall, the photographs are a rich archival resource documenting one man's turbulent journey through a tumultuous period in American history.

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Scope and Contents

The papers of Terence Vincent Powderly document his impact on American history and consist largely of his official correspondence as General Master Workman of the Knights of Labor, 1879-1893, as well as his tenure as an official for both the Immigration and Labor departments, 1897-1924, and Mayor of Scranton, 1878-1884. In addition, there is personal correspondence, photographs, memorabilia, legal and financial records. The bulk of the collection was microfilmed in 1975 and organized into eight series as follows: Knights of Labor, 1864-1924; Immigration and Labor, 1883-1938; Black Diamond Anthracite Coal Company, 1889-1916; Personal Papers, 1869-1937; Printed Matter, 1882-1898; Miscellaneous Files, 1886-1937; Scrapbooks, 1873-1904; and Photographs, ca. 1865-1916. The microfilm edition of the Powderly papers is available in many libraries and the Guide to the Microfilm Edition (1975), edited by John A. Turcheneske and incorporating the work of Jonathan Garlock, is particularly valuable in its content listing of the microfilm reels. Staff at the American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives of The Catholic University of America (CUA) prepared a corresponding box list, with both listings incorporated below. The non-microfilmed material is generally a parallel and more extraneous assemblage that roughly reflects the structure imposed on the bulk of the papers, but including two additional series: Series 9, Mayor of Scranton Administrative Records, 1872(1877-1883)1916 and, Series 10, Memorabilia and Artifacts, undated. This finding aid is presented not as a finished product but as an effort to make the collection more accessible even though a complete folder listing is not yet available.

Series 1, Knights of Labor, 1864-1924, is divided into five parts consisting of correspondence, constitutions, business records, proceedings, and printed material. Subseries 1.1, Correspondence, 1864-1924, is filed chronologically with both incoming letters and 69 volumes of letterpress copy books of outgoing letters. This correspondence is a window into the activities of the Knights in regard to such issues as education, the eight-hour workday, and strikes. In addition, there is information on conflicts and other difficulties like Powderly's view on the role of trade unions and especially the 1893 power struggle which resulted in his resignation. Subseries 1.2, Constitutions and Bylaws, ca. 1870-1900, has printed and incomplete constitutions, including revisions, for the local and district assemblies, filed chronologically by assembly number, as well as the General Assembly, filed chronologically. Subseries 1.3, Business Records, 1876(1876-1893)1915, has microfilmed material including minutes of Local Assembly 222 of Scranton, 1876-1880, and expense accounts, 1888-1892. Material not microfilmed consists of cash books, check books, journal, ledgers, and receipts. Subseries 1.4, Proceedings, 1876-1892, has incomplete and mostly printed proceedings of various assemblies. Those microfilmed cover 1883-1890 for the local, 1877-1890 for the district, 1885-1894 for the state assemblies, and 1878-1902 for the General Assembly. The non-microfilmed miscellaneous items cover 1877 to 1895. Subseries 1.5, 1880-1896, n.d., has general material, 1880-1887; loose issues of the Journal of United Labor, 1880-1889, with the years 1880-1883 on microfilm, and loose issues, not microfilmed here, of the Journal of the Knights of Labor, 1889-1906; printed ritual books, n.d., used in meetings and ceremonies; clipping scrapbooks, 1886-1897, covering news of Powderly and the order; clippings from newspapers and printed leaflets, brochures and form letters, 1877-1897; and additional clippings, 1880-1900, not microfilmed, as well as membership lists and directories, 1877-1890; copies of articles, speeches, and statements of Powderly, 1882-1903; and articles, speeches, and statements of others, 1881-1895. There is both a box listing and a corresponding microfilm reel listing where relevant as well as a partial index of correspondents available for the letters received, Boxes 1-90, that can be searched upon requests being made to the Archives staff at archives@mail.lib.cua.edu.

Series 2, Immigration and Labor, 1883-1938, contains primarily correspondence, illustrating Powderly's capacity as Commissioner-General of Immigration, Chief of the Information Division of the Bureau of Immigration, and as Commissioner of Conciliation for the Department of Labor. Subseries 2.1, Immigration Bureau, Department of the Treasury, 1897(1897-1907)1938, Boxes 121-160, is the meat of this series and has, unlike most other portions of the collection, been substantially re-sorted and re-filed, with a folder list created. There are thousands of letters to and from Powderly, of both personal and professional nature. He corresponded frequently with U.S. senators, including future vice president Charles Fairbanks, and with other government officials, particularly his own subordinates, as well as with many family members, including his brother Joseph, an immigrant inspector in Texas until his death in 1902. There are also hundreds of letters from other politicians and labor activists concerned with endorsing or opposing Powderly's appointment in 1897 and 1898. Most of the letters to Powderly are handwritten, although some are typed, with Powderly's responses generally typed, presumably by either his personal secretary or his chief government clerk with the majority contained in bound letterpress copy books although some exist as loose carbon copies. Subseries 2.2, Immigration Bureau, Information Division, Department of Commerce and Labor, 1883(1900-1922)1931, Boxes 161-168, follows Powderly's later career in government. Included are letters of recommendation, official and private correspondence, reports, and statistics. Subseries 2.3, Immigration and Labor, 1884(1887-1915)1922, Boxes 222-223, contains material not microfilmed, including annual reports of the Commissioner-General of Immigration, a portion of a 1906 travel diary to Europe, an 1888 Congressional investigation report, immigration laws and regulations, immigration pamphlets, news clippings opposing Powderly's 1897 appointment, and news clippings on various issues such as Chinese immigration.

Series 3, Black Diamond Anthracite Coal Company, 1889(1901-1909)1916, has correspondence, reports, and circulars. This company was organized in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, in 1902 and dissolved in 1909. Powderly was elected president in 1902 and did much promotional work for the company, including writing an undated advertising pamphlet titled Coal and a Coal Mine: A Wonderful Coal Property in the Heart of the Great Anthracite Coal Fields of Pennsylvania. He resigned in 1905 after the company encountered economic difficulties and he had begun to suspect their business practices. This series has two divisions. The first has correspondence, 1901-1916, with one part being alphabetical by last name of the sender and the other is unorganized. The second has reports and circulars,1889-1903, that include the minutes of the company's organizational meeting, by-laws, first annual report, a prospectus, and the aforementioned advertising pamphlet by Powderly.

Series 4, Personal Papers, 1866-1937, has general correspondence and notes; various softbound notebooks, calendars, and account books; legal correspondence to and from clients as well as other lawyers; and mostly undated drafts and final copies of addresses, poems, and memorandums that were microfilmed. The non microfilmed portion contain legal documents from before Powderly was a lawyer, going back to 1866, as well as his files and papers from his legal career in Scranton, PA, and Washington, DC, 1893-1912. In addition, there are financial records, both personal and business related, including account books, ledgers, receipts, and bills that involve banking, mining, and real estate. There are also European travel notes on index cards dated 1906 and 1910, calling cards, address books, memberships, and the correspondence and text for the manuscript autobiography "The Path I Trod.".

Series 5, Printed Material, ca. 1870-1937, has select pamphlets relating to the Knights of Labor, including Powderly's speeches and reports on the meetings of local and district assemblies that were microfilmed. The non microfilmed material, including oversized items in Map Case 3, has chronological, topical, and miscellaneous newspaper clippings, with some full issues, as well as general, labor, political, religious, and Irish pamphlets. In addition there are some miscellaneous scrapbooks.

Series 6: Miscellaneous Files, 1886-1937, has microfilmed material consisting of five folders. The first has a transcript of a talk between a Mr. Sinexon and Powderly about their early labor activities. The second and third contain some undated Powderly speeches and poems. The fourth has some miscellaneous Powderly correspondence, including personal and with officials of the Catholic Church. The fifth has both correspondence and clippings regarding the Knights of Labor and the Catholic Church. The non microfilmed material is a two box hodgepodge. In addition, there are 25 oversized documents, 1 map, and 6 drawings/sketches/prints stored in Map Case 3.

Series 7, Scrapbooks, 1873-1904, is a selection of clippings scrapbooks, arranged chronologically with some overlap, relating specifically to Powderly, the Knights of Labor, and Immigration issues. There are gaps for some years such as 1880, 1893-1895, 1897, and 1899.

Series 8, Photographs, n.d., has two parts, with photos taken by Powderly and photos given to or collected by him. The first has a file cabinet and boxes of information sheets and contact prints encompassing the thousands of photographic images produced ca. 1902-1921 by Powderly. They were originally glass and nitrate based negatives and glass lantern slides that were converted, with the support of a NEH grant, to safety film in 1980. Reference prints were made and a card index created to give ready access. Overall, the photographic collection consists of bound information sheets, bound uncut prints, cut prints, and a subject catalog file. Powderly kept nitrate and glass negatives in a collection of envelopes, on which he generally noted the dates of the pictures, their subjects, the type of camera and shutter-speed he used, and other information. Archives staff numbered each of these, which produced a system of accession numbers. The first four digits refer to envelopes whose one, two, or three final numbers refer to the specific photographs within the envelopes. The uncut prints (4" x 5") are arranged usually four to a page in a series of albums and appear more or less in order of accession number. The second set of prints, cut to stand independently in a file, reflect the geographical order in which Powdery himself arranged his envelopes. Cumulative color-coded guide cards, each bearing a range of accession numbers, divide the cut-print files. The subject catalog is an interpretive ordering intended to complement Powderly's geographic order with the following categories: Animals, Buildings, Immigrants, Indians, Landscapes, Photographic Studies, Portraits, Public Ceremonies, Statues and Monuments, Street Scenes, Transportation, and Travels and Tourism. Included are large print copies used in a 1977 exhibit on Ellis Island. The second part consists of numerous photos given to or collected by Powderly during his long career. A selection of 32 numbered photographs were microfilmed as part of this project in 1975 while, in 2002, over 300 were digitized and created as an on-line digital collection sponsored by the Washington Research Libraries Consortium (WRLC). In addition, there are miscellaneous, duplicate, and unprocessed photographs as well.

Series 9, Mayor of Scranton,1872(1877-1883)1916. A variety of items related to Powderly's tenure as a progressive mayor of Scranton, Pennsylvania, including a bail docket (1879-1880), docket of municipal records (1878-1879), annual report (1879), cash book (1877-1878), district voter list (ca. 1880), a Scranton Centennial printed journal (1916), oversized scrapbooks (1876-1879), and some undated postcards.

Series 10, Memorabilia and Artifacts, n.d. Several miscellaneous items, including books inscribed to him or otherwise part of his personal library. There are also engraved wood blocks with Powderly's image or name.

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Arrangement

The Terence Vincent Powderly Papers consists of ten series:











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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

There are no access restrictions.

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Administrative Information

Custodial History

After Powderly's death in 1924, his papers remained with his second wife, Emma Fickenscher, who later transferred them to her sister Daisy who survived her. In a legal document signed September 9, 1939, Daisy transferred all rights to Terence's niece, Mary Powderly. Through the influence of Catholic University professors, Rev. William J. Kerby and Msgr. Francis J. Haas, Miss Powderly donated the papers to CUA on November 7, 1941. In 1943, the Powderly Papers were transferred to Mullen Library and were subject to certain restrictions imposed by Miss Powderly that are no longer in effect.

Acquisition Information

In 1948, Mullen Library transferred the papers to the newly created Department of Archives and Manuscripts. In 1975, Mrs. Robert Corbey donated a Powderly photograph album, and, in 1981, the AFL-CIO donated a bound volume of Knights proceedings. In 2009, additional photographic items and memorabilia were received from the Corbey family.

Processing Information

In 1952, 1958, and 1963, various parts of the papers, including letter press copy books and Knights of Labor proceedings, were microfilmed on campus. These microfilming projects were generally undertaken piece-meal in response to researcher requests. In 1968, CUA Archivist, Moreau B.C. Chambers, initiated a formal grant proposal to the National Historical Publications Commission (NHPC) to microfilm both the Powderly and John W. Hayes Papers, since both men were central to the Knights of Labor. In 1969, when NHPC rejected this grant proposal, citing lack of funds, CUA began to contact other organizations, such as the AFL-CIO. In 1972 and 1973, Professor Jonathan Garlock of the University of Rochester, who had used the papers extensively for his own research, developed a revamped microfilming and indexing proposal. In a letter dated 18 May 1973, Lloyd Wagner, Director of Libraries, informed Dr. Garlock that CUA had decided to pursue its own plans for indexing and microfilming the Powderly papers. In 1974, work was undertaken and funded by the Microfilming Corporation of America. The editor of the project was John A. Turcheneske, Jr. and his printed Guide to the Microfilm Edition incorporated text and research of Dr. Garlock. Restrictions on access were apparently lifted by Mary Powderly in the 1950s and this was confirmed in 1970 by Powderly's great nieces, Mrs. Ruth Ziebart and Mrs. Robert Corbey.

Until the 1990s the microfilm guide was used, so much as possible, as the primary means of accessing the Powderly papers. This was cumbersome at best, so efforts to process the papers and prepare a more formal archival finding aid were begun by William John Shepherd under the direction of Archivist Anthony Zito (retired 1994). Incorporating the work of Mr. Turcheneske and Dr. Garlock, Mr. Shepherd continued these efforts as time permited, with the help of several student assistants including Mary Beth Fraser, Marcella Fredrikkson, Andrew Kauffman, Jennifer Learned, Jason Mayernick, Chris Rounds. Benjamin Justesen, a practicum student, was especially invaluable for his work on the first subseries of Series 2. Andrew Sherlock, a volunteer, also did valuable work with the remaining files of Series 2 as well as those for series 3 and 4. The initial version of the finding aid was completed in September 2007 with EAD markup undertaken by Mr. Shepherd with the assistance of W. Jordan Patty, completed in September 2007. Revised and expanded to include the work of Mr. Justesen in 2009 and that of Mr. Sherlock in 2011.

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Related Material

Also housed at Catholic University are the Mother Jones Collection, The John Hayes Papers, and the John Mitchell Papers. Online digitized material includes The Terence Vincent Powderly Photographic Prints Digital Collection, Terence Vincent Powderly and Ellis Island, 1897-1901, and Terence Vincent Powderly Photographic Collections at ACUA.

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Index Terms

This record series is indexed under the following controlled access subject terms.


Persons:
Arthur, Chester Alan, 1829-1886
Barry, Lenore
Beaumont, Ralph
Buchanan, Joseph Ray, 1851-1924
Cavanaugh, Hugh
Gibbons, James, 1834-1921
Gompers, Samuel, 1850-1924
Griffiths, Richard
Hayes, John William, 1854-1942
Hayes, Rutherford Birchard, 1822-1893
Jones, Mother, 1843?-1930
Lichtman, Charles
McBride, John, 1854-1917
Powderly, Terence Vincent, 1849-1924
Trevillick, Richard
Watchorn, Robert, 1858-1944

Organizations:
Knights of Labor

Places:
Scranton (Pa.)
Washington (D.C)

Subjects:
Church and labor
Emigration and immigration
Republican Party (U.S. : 1854- )
Women in the labor movement


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Select Bibliography

Beaty, James Harold. Life and Speaking of Terence Powderly. Ph.D. Dissertation, Florida State University, 1967.

 

Brexel, Bernadette. The Knights of Labor and the Haymarket Riot: The Fight for an Eight-Hour Workday (America's Industrial Society in the Nineteenth Century). Rosen Publishing Group, 2004.

 

Brown, Henry Vincent. The Catholic Church and the Knights of Labor. Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 1949.

 

Falzone, Vincent J. Terence V. Powderly: Middle Class Reformer. Washington, D.C.: University Press of America, 1978.

 

Falzone, Vincent J. 'Terence V. Powderly: Politician and Progressive Mayor of Scranton, 1878-1884,' Pennsylvania History, (41: 3), 1974, pp. 289-309.

 

Fink, Leon. Workingmen's Democracy: The Knights of Labor and American Politics. Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1985.

 

Foner, Philip F. and Lewis, Ronald L. The Black Worker during the Era of the Knights of Labor. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1979.

 

Fones-Wolf, Elizabeth and Fones-Wolf, Kenneth. 'Knights Versus the Trade Unionists: The Case of the Washington, D.C. Carpenters, 1881-1896,' Labor History, (22: 2), 1981, pp. 192-212.

 

Garlock, Jonathan Ezra (Compiler). Guide to the Local Assemblies of the Knights of Labor. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1982.

 

Garlock, Jonathan Ezra. 'The Knights of Labor Data-Bank,' Historical Methods Newsletter, (6: 4), 1973, pp. 149-160.

 

Gerteis, Joseph. Class and Color Line: Interracial Class Coalition in the Knights of Labor and the Populist Movement. Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 2007

 

Grob, Gerald N. 'Terence V. Powderly and the Knights of Labor,' Mid-America, (39: 1), 1957, pp. 39-55.

 

Gutman, Herbert G. 'The Knights of Labor and Patrician Anti-Semitism: 1891,' Labor History, (13: 1), 1972, pp. 63-67.

 

Hild, Mathew. Greenbackers, Knights of Labor, and Populists: Farm-labor Insurgency in the Late-nineteenth-century South. Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press, 2007

 

James, Edward T. 'T.V. Powderly, A Political Profile,' The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, (XCIX), 1975, pp. 443-459.

 

Levine, Susan Beth. Their Own Sphere: Women's Work, the Knights of Labor, and the Transformation of the Carpet Trade, 1870-1890. Ph.D. Dissertation, City University of New York, 1979.

 

Marcus, Irwin Murray. The Knights of Labor: Reform Aspects. Ph.D. Dissertation, Lehigh University, 1965.

 

McLaurin, Melton Alonza. The Knights of Labor in the South. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 1978.

 

Oestreicher, Richard. 'Terence V. Powderly, the Knights of Labor, and Artisanal Republicanism,' Labor Leaders in America. Dubofsy, Melvin and Van Tine, Warren (eds.). Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1987, pp. 30-61.

 

Phelan, Craig Phelan. Grand Master Workman: Terence Powderly and the Knights of Labor. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 2000.

 

Powderly, Terence V. The Path I Trod: The Autobiography of Terence V. Powderly. New York: Columbia University Press, 1940.

 

Powderly, Terence V. Thirty Years of Labor, 1859-1889. Columbus, Ohio: Excelsior Publishing House, 1889.

 

Shepherd, William John, and Corrigan, Mary Beth. 'Becoming a Capital City: The Photographs of Terence Vincent Powderly,' Washington History (No. 2:  2012), pp. 116-135. 

 

Shepherd, William John. ‘Terence Powderly: Labor Leader, Civil Servant, Photographer,’ Potomac Catholic Heritage (24), Summer 2012, pp. 19-23.

 

Shepherd, William John. 'Terence Vincent Powderly,' The Columbia Guide to Irish American History. Timothy Meagher. New York: Columbia University Press, 2005, pp. 297-298.

 

Turcheneske, John A. , Jr. (Ed.) Terence Vincent Powderly Papers, 1864-1937 and John William Hayes, 1880-1921, The Knights of Labor: A Guide to the Microfilm Edition. Glen Rock, NJ: Microfilming Corporation of America, 1975.

 

Voss, Kim. The Making of American Exceptionalism: The Knights of Labor and Class Formation in the Nineteenth Century. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1993.

 

Walker, Samuel Emlen. Terence V. Powderly, 'Labor Mayor,': Workingmen's Politics in Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1870-1884. Ph.D. Dissertation, The Ohio State University, 1973.

 

Walker, Samuel Emlen. 'Terence V. Powderly, Machinist: 1866-1877,' Labor History, (19: 2), Spring 1978, pp. 165-184.

 

Ware, Norman J. The Labor Movement in the United States, 1860-1895: A Study in Democracy. New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1929.

 

Weir, Robert E. 'A Fragile Alliance: Henry George and the Knights of Labor,' American Journal of Economics and Sociology, (56:4), 1997, pp. 421-439.

 

Weir, Robert E. Behind Labor's Veil: The Culture of the Knights of Labor. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996.

 

Weir, Robert E. Knights Unhorsed: Internal Conflict in a Gilded Age Social Movement. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2001.

 

Return to the Table of Contents


Detailed Description of the Collection

                       
Series 1: Knights of Labor 1864-1924 (126 boxes)
The Knights of Labor series material on microfilm is divided into five sub-series consisting of correspondence, constitutions, business records, proceedings, and printed mater. The bulk of this is correspondence divided between letters received and letterpress copy books of outgoing letters. The Guide to the Microfilm Edition (1975), edited by John A. Turcheneske, has a content listing of the microfilm reels, while, more recently, Catholic University Archives staff created a corresponding box list, with both listings incorporated below into this finding aid. There is also a partial index of correspondents available for the letters received, Boxes 1-90, which can be searched upon requests being made to the Archives staff at archives@mail.lib.cua.edu. The non-microfilmed material is generally parallel and more extraneous.
Subseries 1.1: Correspondence, 1864-1924 (105 boxes)
 
Box Reel
1 1 Letters Received, 1864-December 1877
Box Reel
2 1 Letters Received, January 1878-October 1879
Box Reel
3 2 Letters Received, 1879-May 1880
Box Reel
4 2-3 Letters Received, June 1880-August 1881
Box Reel
5 3 Letters Received, September 1881-April 1882
Box Reel
6 3-4 Letters Received, May 1882-October 1882
Box Reel
7 4-5 Letters Received, November 1882-March 1883
Box Reel
8 5-6 Letters Received, April 1883-October 15, 1883
Box Reel
9 6 Letters Received, October 16, 1883-January 1884
Box Reel
10 6-7 Letters Received, February 1884-May 1884
Box Reel
11 No reel Letters Received, June 1884-August 1884
Box Reel
12 8 Letters Received, September 1884-December 1884
Box Reel
13 8-9 Letters Received, January 1885-May 1885
Box Reel
14 10 Letters Received, June 1885-September 1885
Box Reel
15 10-11 Letters Received, October 1885-December 1885
Box Reel
16 11-12 Letters Received, December 1885-January 17, 1886
Box Reel
17 12-13 Letters Received, January 18, 1886-February 20, 1886
Box Reel
18 14 Letters Received, February 26, 1886-March 15, 1886
Box Reel
19 14-15 Letters Received, March 16, 1886-April 10, 1886
Box Reel
20 15 Letters Received, April 11, 1886-April 26, 1886
Box Reel
21 15-16 Letters Received, April 27, 1886-May 31, 1886
Box Reel
22 16-17 Letters Received, June 1886
Box Reel
23 17 Letters Received, July 1886
Box Reel
24 17-18 Letters Received, August 1886
Box Reel
25 18 Letters Received, September 1886-October 10, 1886
Box Reel
26 No Reel Letters Received, October 11, 1886-November 15, 1886
Box Reel
27 19 Letters Received, November 16, 1886-December 19, 1886
Box Reel
28 20 Letters Received, December 20, 1886
Box Reel
29 20 Letters Received, January 1, 1887-January 25, 1887
Box Reel
30 21 Letters Received, January 26, 1887-February 19, 1887
Box Reel
31 21 Letters Received, February 20, 1887-March 23, 1887
Box Reel
32 21-22 Letters Received, March 24, 1887-April 24, 1887
Box Reel
33 22 Letters Received, April 25, 1887-June 21, 1887
Box Reel
34 22 Letters Received, June 22, 1887-July 31, 1887
Box Reel
35 23 Letters Received, August 1887
Box Reel
36 23 Letters Received, September 1887-October 13, 1887
Box Reel
37 23-24 Letters Received, October 14, 1887-November 26, 1887
Box Reel
38 24 Letters Received, November 27, 1887-December 24, 1887
Box Reel
39 24 Letters Received, December 25, 1887-January 15, 1888
Box Reel
40 24-25 Letters Received, January 16, 1888-February 16, 1888
Box Reel
41 25 Letters Received, February 17, 1888-March 19, 1888
Box Reel
42 25 Letters Received, March 20, 1888-April 7, 1888
Box Reel
43 26 Letters Received, April 8, 1888-May 6, 1888
Box Reel
44 26 Letters Received, May 7, 1888-June 11, 1888
Box Reel
45 26-27 Letters Received, June 12, 1888-July 20, 1888
Box Reel
46 27 Letters Received, July 21, 1888-August 31, 1888
Box Reel
47 27 Letters Received, September 1, 1888-October 10, 1888
Box Reel
48 27-28 Letters Received, October 11, 1888-November 13, 1888
Box Reel
49 28 Letters Received, November 14, 1888-December 24, 1888
Box Reel
50 28 Letters Received, December 25, 1888-January 13, 1889
Box Reel
51 28-29 Letters Received, January 13, 1889-February 1889
Box Reel
52 29 Letters Received, March 1889-April 9, 1889
Box Reel
53 30 Letters Received, April 10, 1889-May 1889
Box Reel
54 30 Letters Received, June 1889-July 20, 1889
Box Reel
55 31 Letters Received, June 22, 1889-September 15, 1889
Box Reel
56 31 Letters Received, September 16, 1889-November 19, 1889
Box Reel
57 31 Letters Received, November 21, 1889-December 1889
Box Reel
58 32 Letters Received, January 1890-February 1890
Box Reel
59 32 Letters Received, February 21, 1890-April 15, 1890
Box Reel
60 32-33 Letters Received, April 1890-June 1890
Box Reel
61 33 Letters Received, June 11, 1890-August 8, 1890
Box Reel
62 33-34 Letters Received, August 1890-September 25, 1890
Box Reel
63 35 Letters Received, September 26, 1890-October 1890
Box Reel
64 34-35 Letters Received, November 1890-December 1890
Box Reel
65 35 Letters Received, Undated 1890-January 1891
Box Reel
66 35-36 Letters Received, February 1891-April 10, 1891
Box Reel
67 36 Letters Received, April 11, 1891-June 1891
Box Reel
68 36 Letters Received, July 1891-August 1891
Box Reel
69 36-37 Letters Received, September 1891-November 1891
Box Reel
70 37 Letters Received, December 1891-January 15, 1892
Box Reel
71 37-38 Letters Received, January 16, 1892-March 15, 1892
Box Reel
72 38 Letters Received, March 16, 1892-May 1892
Box Reel
73 38-39 Letters Received, June 1892-August 15, 1892
Box Reel
74 39 Letters Received, August 15, 1892-October 20, 1892
Box Reel
75 39 Letters Received, October 21, 1892-December 1892
Box Reel
76 40 Letters Received, Undated 1892-January 1893
Box Reel
77 40-41 Letters Received, February 1893-March 22, 1893
Box Reel
78 41 Letters Received, March 23, 1893-April 26, 1893
Box Reel
79 41 Letters Received, April 27, 1893-June 22, 1893
Box Reel
80 42 Letters Received, June 23, 1893-August 11, 1893
Box Reel
81 42-43 Letters Received, August 12, 1893-September 1893
Box Reel
82 42-43 Letters Received, October 1893-November 20, 1893
Box Reel
83 43 Letters Received, November 21, 1893-December 1893
Box Reel
84 60 Letters Received, January 1894-April 15, 1894
Box Reel
85 60 Letters Received, April 16, 1894-July 1894
Box Reel
86 61 Letters Received, August 1894-November 1894
Box Reel
87 61 Letters Received, December 1894-March 15, 1895
Box Reel
88 61 Letters Received, March 16, 1895-December 1895
Box Reel
89 62 Letters Received, 1896
Box Reel
90 62 Letters Received, 1898-1924
Box Reel
91 44-45 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1878-1882
Box Reel
92 45 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1880-1884
Box Reel
93 46 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1880-1886
Box Reel
94 46-47 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1884-1890
Box Reel
95 47 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1886
Box Reel
96 48 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1886-1887
Box Reel
97 48-49 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1887
Box Reel
98 50-51 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1898
Box Reel
99 51-52 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1888-1889
Box Reel
100 52-53 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1889-1890
Box Reel
101 53-55 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1889-1891
Box Reel
102 55-56 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1890-1892
Box Reel
103 56-57 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1891-1892
Box Reel
104 57-59 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1892-1893
Box Reel
105 59-63 Letters Sent (Letterpress Copy Books), 1893-1897
Subseries 1.2: Constitutions and By-Laws, ca. 1870-1900 (2 boxes)
 
Box Reel
106 64 Constitutions and By-Laws, 1878-1900
Box  
213   Constitutions and By-Laws, ca. 1870-1900
        Not on Microfilm
Subseries 1.3: Business Records, 1876(1876-1893)1915 (4 boxes)
 
Box Reel
107 65 Business Records, 1877-1881
Box Reel
108 65 Business Records, 1876-1889
Box Reel
109 65 Business Records, 1888-1892
Box  
216   Business Records, 1877-1894
        Not on Microfilm
Subseries 1.4: Proceedings, 1876-1892 (8 boxes)
 
Box Reel
110 65 Local Assemblies, 1883-1890
Box Reel
111 65 District Assemblies, 1877-1890
Box Reel
112 66 State Assemblies, 1885-1894
Box Reel
113 67 General Assemblies, 1878-1902
Box Reel
114 67 General Assemblies, 1883-1902
Box Reel
115 67 Convention Reports and Proceedings, 1877-1894
  68 Convention Reports and Proceedings, 1880-1887
Box  
214-215   Miscellaneous, 1877-1895
        Not on Microfilm
Subseries 1.5: Printed Material, 1880-1906, n.d. (8 boxes)
 
Box Reel
116 68 General, 1880-1887
Box Reel
  68 Journal of the Knights of Labor/Journal of United Labor, 1880-1883
        Copies of the Journal for the year 1887-1896, that were not microfilmed, are located in oversize boxes 260-263. They are fragile and cannot be photocopied nor scanned.
Box Reel
117 68 Printed Ritual Books of the Knights of Labor, n.d.
Box Reel
118 69 Clipping Scrapbooks, 1886-1897
Box Reel
119 69 Clippings, speeches, and writings, 1886-1897
Box Reel
120 69 Clipping Scrapbooks, 1877-1886
Box  
216   Lists and Directories, 1877-1886
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
217   Powderly Articles, Speeches, and Statements, 1882-1903
        Not on Microfilm
    Non-Powderly Articles, Speeches, and Statements, 1881-1895
        Not on Microfilm
    Clippings, 1880-1900
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
218   Clippings, 1880-1900
        Not on Microfilm
                       
Series 2: Immigration and Labor, 1883-1938 (50 boxes)
The Immigration and Labor series reflects Powderly's role as a federal official, 1897-1924, and is divided into three sub-series, with the first two containing material microfilmed in 1975 and the first also having an individual folder listing. Included is official correspondence, both loose and bound in letterpress copy books, personal correspondence, letters of recommendation, annual and other reports, a travel diary, miscellaneous items, and various printed materials including pamphlets and news clippings.
Subseries 2.1: Immigration Bureau, Department of the Treasury, 1897(1897-1907)1938 (40 boxes)
 
Box Reel
121-160 70-79, 81 Immigration Bureau, Department of the Treasury, 1897-1907
Box Folder
121 1 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897-1898, A-L: Part I-A, April 1897-August 1897
        Notable examples: W. H. Allen (2); T. Thomas Fortune (1); James J. Holland (2), lawyer, Jacksonville, Fla.; Samuel H. Keefe, U.S. Consul to Grenoble (1); Peter B. Laird (3),
  2 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897-1898, A-L: Part I-B, August 1897-March 1898
        Notable examples: John J. Bealin, William J. Burke, J. C. Delaney, J. J. Holland, R. D. Layton,
  3 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897-1898, M-Z: Part II-A, September 1896; July-August 1897
        Notable examples: T. V. Powderly J. (nephew); Richard Powers (2); Robert Watchorn,
  4 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897-1898, M-Z: Part II-B, August 1897-March 1898
        Notable examples: W. R. O'Shaughnessy, Rev. Madison Peters, New York
  5 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897, Letters of protest/Recommendation, A-Z, Part 1, n.d.
  6 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1897, Letters of protest/Recommendation, A-Z, Part 2, n.d.
  7 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1902, Letters of protest/Recommendation, n.d.
  8 Immigration Correspondence, Letters of congratulation/protest, 1902, Letters of protest/Recommendation, n.d.
Box Folder
122 1 General/Official Correspondence, Aa-Alexander n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. Robert Adams Jr., Pennsylvania; Rep. D. S. Alexander, New York,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Alf-Az n.d.
        Notable examples: W. R. Anderson, Clerk to U.S. Sen. Boies Penrose, Pennsylvania(3); Rep. William C. Arnold, Pennsylvania,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Allen, W. H., Brooklyn, New York, Appointment as Chinese Inspector, 1900-1901
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Anderson, A. S., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, International Navigation Co., 1900-1902
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Arbeely, N. J., New York, Inspector, Lawyer, 1900-1902
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ba-Baz, n.d.
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Baker, E[dward], Nogales, Arizona, Inspector, 1901
        Chinese smuggling (Re: Alleged corruption with Chinese inspector, 1901)
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Bea-Bez, n.d.
        Notable examples: John J. Bealin; James M. Beck, Asst. U.S. Attorney General (6)
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Beaumont, Ralph, Canada, Inspector, 1900-1903?
Box Folder
123 1 General/Official Correspondence, Bi-Biz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. Henry H. Bingham, Pennsylvania (3),
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Biglin, B., New York, 1900-1901
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Billings, George B., Boston, Massachusetts, 1900-1902
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Bl-Bol, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Bom-Boz, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Bostroem, August, New York, Inspector, 1901-1902
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Bra-Braz, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Bradsby, H. C., 1899-1900
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Bre-Bry, n.d.
        Notable examples: James A. Brosnahan; Rep. M. Brosius, Pennsylvania; Rep. Charles N. Brumm, Pennsylvania,
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Browne, Warren C., New York, 1899-1901
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Bu-Burdick, n.d.
        Notable examples: Harry Burdette
  12 General/Official Correspondence, Burke (all), n.d.
  13 General/Official Correspondence, Burns-Bz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. Theodore E. Burton, Ohio; Rep. Thomas S. Butler, Pennsylvania,
  14 General/Official Correspondence, Burst, J. W., Chicago, Illinois, Immigration Inspector, 1900-1902
Box Folder
124 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ca-Can, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Cain, James, Pension papers, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Campbell, James, 1899-1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Campbell, Richard K., 1899-1900, 1905
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Cap-Cat, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Cav-Ch, n.d.
        Notable Examples: Fessenden Chase
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Cavanaugh, Hugh, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1897-1902
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Chandler, Sen. W. E., n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Ci-Cla, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. S. M. Clark, Iowa,
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Cle-Cog, n.d.
        Notable examples: George B. Cock; U. S. Rep. James H. Codding, Pennsylvania,
Box Folder
125 1 General/Official Correspondence, Coh-Col, 1897-1904
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Com-Connell, 1899-1903
        Notable examples: Thomas Conaty, The Catholic University of America,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Connell, Rep. William, Pennsylvania, 1897-1903
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Connors-Coo, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Cop-Coz, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Cortelyou, George B., Secretary to Theodore Roosevelt, 1899-1903
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Cowley, C. O'C., Letters and Exhibits for Hearing, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Cr-Cz, n.d.
Box Folder
126 1 General/Official Correspondence, Dal-Dar, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. John Dalzell, Pennsylvania,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Dau-Daz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. S.A. Davenport, Pennsylvania,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Dawes, Charles G., 1898-1901
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Dea-Del, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Deal, Horace M., March-May 1900
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Deal, Horace M., June 1900-1901
  7 General/Official Correspondence, DeBarry, John R., 1898-1901
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Dem-Dez, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Di-Di n.d.
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Dick, Charles A., 1897-98
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Dick, Charles A., 1899-April 1900
  12 General/Official Correspondence, Dick, Charles A., May-December 1900
  13 General/Official Correspondence, Dick, Charles A., 1901, 1904
Box Folder
127 1 General/Official Correspondence, Doa-Doo n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. J. P. Dolliver, Iowa,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Dor-Doz, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Dobler, Roman, inspector, 1897-July 1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Dobler, Roman, inspector, August 1900-May 1901
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Dobler, Roman, inspector, June -September 1901
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Dobler, Roman, inspector, October 1901-1902, 1906
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Dr-Dz, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Dunn, James R., inspector, 1900-September 1901
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Dunn, James R., inspector, October 1901-1902
Box Folder
128 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ea-El, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Eiler, Madge, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Elkins, Sen. Stephen B., West Virginia, 1899-1901
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Em-Ez, n.d.
        Notable examples: S. A. Eppler, Cal. Ewing,
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Estell, W. B., Inspector, 1897-1898
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Estell, W. B., Inspector, 1899-1902
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Fa-Fh, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Fairbanks, Sen. Charles W., Indiana, 1897-1898
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Fairbanks, Sen. Charles W., Indiana, 1899
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Fairbanks, Sen. Charles W., Indiana, 1900-1903, 1907
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Feeney, J. L., 1900-1902
Box Folder
129 1 General/Official Correspondence, Fi-Fit, n.d.
        Notable examples: T. J. Fitzmorris, U. S. Rep. John F. Fitzgerald, Massachusetts,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, Immigration Inspector, 1897- March 1898
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, April-December 1898
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, January-June 1899
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, July-December 1899
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, 1900-May 1901
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, October-December 1901
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Fitchie, Thomas, 1902
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Fitzgerald, Thomas, 1897-1898
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Fl-Fo, n.d.
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Fr-Fu, n.d.
  12 General/Official Correspondence, Francis, Joseph, 1898-1901
Box Folder
130 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ga-Gaz, n.d.
        Notable examples: T. St. John Gaffney; U. S. Sen. Jacob H. Gallinger, New Hampshire; U. S. Rep. John J. Gardner, New Jersey,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Gage, Lyman J., U. S. Treasury Secretary, 1897-1902
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Galagher, Dr. Michael F., Inspector, 1901-1904
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Garland, B. F., Special Chinese Inspector, 1900- May 1901
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Garland, B. F., Special Chinese Inspector, June-July 1901
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Garland, B. F., Special Chinese Inspector, August-October 1901
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Garland, B. F., Special Chinese Inspector, November-December 1901
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Garland, B. F., Special Chinese Inspector, 1902-1904
Box Folder
131 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ge-Go, n.d.
        Notable examples: J. Cardinal Gibbons, General J. B. Gordon,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Gompers, Samuel, Private correspondence with E. F. McSweeney, 1898-1901
        Folder 5
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Gr-Griffin, n.d.
        Notable examples: Sen. George E. Green,
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Greenhalgh, Oscar, 1901-1902
        Folder 5
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Griffith-Gz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U.S. Rep. Galusha A. Grow, Pennsylvania; George Gunton, New York,
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ha-Han, n.d.
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Hampton, Alfred, 1898-1902
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Hanna, U. S. Sen. Mark A., Ohio, 1897-1900
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Hanna, U. S. Sen. Mark A., Ohio, 1901-1902
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Har-Has, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. Alfred Harmer, Pennsylvania,
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Hat-Haz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Secretary of State John Hay; D. A. Hayes, Labor Leader,
  12 General/Official Correspondence, Hatch, William M., 1901-1902
Box Folder
132 1 General/Official Correspondence, Hea-Hem, n.d.
        Notable examples: William Randolph Hearst,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Healy, David, Inspector, 1897-1899, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Healy, David, Inspector, 1900-1903, 1905
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Hen-Hep, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. D. B. Henderson, Maine; John J. Henry, Secret Service Agent, reports;Rep. Hepburn, Iowa,
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Henninghausen, Percy C., Inspector, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Her-Holland, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. Hicks, Pennsylvania,
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Hobart, Vice President Garret A., 1898-1899
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Holland, James J. and Maude W. (Daughter), 1897-1901, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Holman-Hoz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. Albert J. Hopkins, Illinois,
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Hu-Hz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. John A. T. Hull, Iowa; C. P. Huntington,
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Hustis, F. D., Inspector, n.d.
Box Folder
133 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ia-Iz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. John Ireland, Minnesota,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Ja-Je, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Ji-Jones, n.d.
        Notable examples: John R. Jones,
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Jordan-Jz, n.d.
        Notable examples: Edward L. Jordan; J. J. Jordan,
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Ka-Kem, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ken-Ky, n.d.
        Notable Examples: Frank A. Kennedy; John L. Kennedy, member, U.S. Industrial Commission; Kentucky legislator John R. Kilday; U. S. Sen. James H. Kyle,
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Kerby, William J., The Catholic University of America, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, La-Lav, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. John Lacey, Iowa; Samson Lane,
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Laird, Peter B., n.d.
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Larned, Frank H., n.d.
Box Folder
134 1 General/Official Correspondence, Law-Lawson, n.d.
        Notable examples: A. M. Lawson; Jesse Lawson, African American leader,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Lawlor, Daniel F., Recording Secretary, Knights of Labor, Albany, New York, and Adjutant, Regular Army and Navy Union, U. S. A., 1897-February 1898
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Lawlor, Daniel F., March 1898- 1899
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Layton, Robert D., 1897-1898
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Layton, Robert D., 1899
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Layton, Robert D., 1900
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Layton, Robert D., 1901-1905
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Lea-Led, n.d.
        Notable examples: John Lederhilger, Bureau of Immigration,
Box Folder
135 1 General/Official Correspondence, Lee (Miscellaneous), n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Edward J., Albany, New York, 1897-1899
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., 1896- March 1897
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., April-May 1897
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., June-December 1897
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., 1898-1899
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., 1900
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Lee, Tim F., 1901-1902, 1905
Box Folder
136 1 General/Official Correspondence, Lef-Lew, n.d.
        Notable examples: Dr. A. H. P. Leuf,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Li- Li, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Litchman, Charles H., 1899-1901
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Lo-Ly, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Lodge, U. S. Sen. Henry Cabot, Massachusetts, 1897-1902
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ma-McCurdy, n.d.
        Notable examples: William MacNair, Recording Secretary, Knights of Labor, New York; U. S. Sen. George W. McBride, California; Rep. George B.McClellan, New York,
  7 General/Official Correspondence, McD-McF, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, McG-McG, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, McH-McK, n.d.
  10 General/Official Correspondence, McKinley, William, March-1897- 1898, 1900, n.d.
        Correspondence (1897-1900) with President William McKinley (one letter from McKinley, others from White House secretaries John Addison Porter, George B. Cortelyou)
Box Folder
137 1 General/Official Correspondence, McL-McS, n.d.
        Notable examples: Rep. James McMillan
  2 General/Official Correspondence, MacNair, William, 1897-1900
  3 General/Official Correspondence, MacNair, William, 1901-1902, n.d.
  4 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeney, Edward F., 1897
  5 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeeney, Edward F., Passes, 1894-1900
  6 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeney, Edward F., 1898
  7 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeney, Edward F., 1899
  8 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeney, Edward F., 1900-1901
  9 General/Official Correspondence, McSweeney, Edward F., 1902
Box Folder
138 1 General/Official Correspondence, Mad-Mar, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Mas-Mez, n.d.
        Notable examples: George D. Meiklejohn,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Mi-Moo, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Sen. John H. Mitchell, Oregon,
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Milholland, John E., 1897-1902, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Miller, Cameron, Inspector, 1897-1898
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Miller, Cameron, 1899-1901
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Mor-Moy, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Mu-Mz, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Murray, George J., 1899 -1902, 1904
Box Folder
139 1 General/Official Correspondence, Na-Nz, n.d.
        Notable examples: John G. Nagengast, Gov. G. K. Nash, Ohio; Sen. Knute Nelson,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, North, Hart H., Inspector, Attorney, 1898-1902
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Oa-Oz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. M. E. Olmsted, Pennsylvania,
  4 General/Official Correspondence, O'B-O'K, n.d.
        Notable examples: Roger O'Donnell,
  5 General/Official Correspondence, O'Beirne, General James R., 1901-1902
  6 General/Official Correspondence, O'L-O'T, n.d.
        Notable examples: Patrick O'Neill, Philadelphia; James C. O'Neill, New York,
Box Folder
140 1 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, 1897
  2 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, 1898-1899
  3 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, 1900-July 1902
  4 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, August-December 1902
  5 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, 1903
  6 General/Official Correspondence, O'Reilly, Thomas, 1904
  7 General/Official Correspondence, O'Sullivan, James, 1897-1902
Box Folder
141 1 General/Official Correspondence, Pa-Paz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. (H. W.?) Palmer, Pennsylvania; L. H. Patterson,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Parsons, John N., 1898-1904
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Pe-Pez, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. George W. Pearre, Maryland,
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Penrose, U. S. Sen. Boies, Pennsylvania, 1900-1903
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Ph-Pl, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Sen. T. C. Platt, New York?,
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Po-Pu, n.d.
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Powers, Richard, 1897-1899
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Qa-Qz, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Quay, Sen. Matthew S., Pennsylvania, n.d.
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Quigley, Thomas J., n.d.
  11 General/Official Correspondence, Quinlan, John J., 1898-1902
Box Folder
142 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ra-Ree, n.d.
        Notable examples: Charles A. Ray, Harrison Reed,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Ratchford, M. D., n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Reed, Theodore F., August-October 1901
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Reed, Theodore F., November-December 1901
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Reed, Theodore F., 1902, 1906
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ref-Ri, n.d.
        Notable examples: J. Castle Ridgway,
Box Folder
143 1 General/Official Correspondence, Roa-Roa, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Rob-Roo, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. Edward Robbins, Pennsylvania; William G. Robinson, Dean, The Catholic University of America School of Law,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Rodgers, John J. S., 1897-1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Rodgers, John J. S., 1901-1902
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Roosevelt, Theodore, 1898-1902, 1906
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Ros-Rz, n.d.
Box Folder
144 1 General/Official Correspondence, Sa-Sc, n.d.
        Notable examples: James Gardner Sanderson,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Sackett, William E., n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Sargent, Frank P., 1897-1903
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Saxton, Herbert, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Se-Si, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Seraphic, Alcibiades A., 1899-1900
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Sherman, Augustus F., n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Sk-Sl, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Skeffington, Henry J., 1897-1904
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Sladovich, Dr. George A., 1900-1905
Box Folder
145 1 General/Official Correspondence, Sma-Smz, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Smiley, Milton, 1897-June 1900
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Smiley, Milton J., July 1900-1902
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Sn-Sp, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Sen. (John G.?) Spooner, Wisconsin,
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Sr-Ste, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. Fred. C. Stevens,
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Sti-Str, n.d.
        Notable examples: D. Augustus Straker,
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Stillwell, S. B., n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Stu-Sz, n.d.
Box Folder
146 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ta-Thi, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Tho-Tho, n.d.
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Thompson, Clarence A., 1898-September 1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Thompson, Clarence A., October 1900-1903
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Thr-Tz, n.d.
        Notable examples: U. S. Rep. A. S. Tompkins, New York,
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Tuite, Thomas P., 1897
Box Folder
147 1 General/Official Correspondence, Ua-Uz, n.d.
        U. S. Rep. Thomas Updegraff, Iowa,
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Va-Ve, n.d.
        Notable Examples: John L. Vance,
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Vi-Vz, n.d.
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Wa-Wal, n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Wan-Waz, n.d.
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Warner, William, n.d.
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, 1897-August 1898
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, September-December 1898
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, January-July 1899
  10 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, August 1899
Box Folder
148 1 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, September -December 1899
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, January-March 1900
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, March 1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, April 1900
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, May-October 1900
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, November 1900-January 1901
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, February-March 1901
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, April-May 1901
Box Folder
149 1 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, June-July 1901
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, August-November 1901
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, December 1901-February 1902
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, March-May 1902
  5 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, June 1902-February 1903
Box Folder
150 1 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, March-December 1903
  2 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, 1904
  3 General/Official Correspondence, Watchorn, Robert, 1905-1906
  4 General/Official Correspondence, Waudby, William S., n.d.
  5 General/Official Correspondence, We-Wh, n.d.
        Notable Examples: Rep. George H. White, North Carolina,
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Wia-Williams, n.d.
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Wilm-Win, n.d.
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Wo-Wz, n.d.
  9 General/Official Correspondence, Wright, A. W., 1897-1902
Box Folder
151 1 General/Official Correspondence, X-Y-Z, n.d.
  2 General/Official Correspondence, You, A. J., January-April 1900
  3 General/Official Correspondence, You, A. J., May- 1900
  4 General/Official Correspondence, You, A. J., June-August 1900
  5 General/Official Correspondence, You, A. J., September 1900-1901
  6 General/Official Correspondence, Miscellaneous, n.d.
        Notes, fragments of letters, unsigned letters, report drafts
  7 General/Official Correspondence, Miscellaneous, n.d.
        Notes, fragments of letters, unsigned letters, report drafts
  8 General/Official Correspondence, Miscellaneous, n.d.
        Notes, fragments of letters, unsigned letters, report drafts
Box Folder
152 1 Private Correspondence, Aa-Az, n.d.
  2 Private Correspondence, Ba-Be, n.d.
  3 Private Correspondence, Bi-Bz, n.d.
  4 Private Correspondence, Ca-Ce, n.d.
  5 Private Correspondence, Ch-Cz, n.d.
  6 Private Correspondence, Collins Family (Assorted relatives), 1898-1902
  7 Private Correspondence, Da-De, n.d.
  8 Private Correspondence, Dever Family, n.d.
  9 Private Correspondence, Di-Dz, n.d.
Box Folder
153 1 Private Correspondence, Ea-Ez, n.d.
  2 Private Correspondence, Fa-Fz, n.d.
  3 Private Correspondence, Fickensher, Emma, (secretary), 1898
  4 Private Correspondence, Fickensher, Emma, (secretary), 1899-1904
  5 Private Correspondence, Fickensher, Emma, (secretary), 1905-1921
  6 Private Correspondence, Fickensher, Emma (secretary, second wife), n.d.
  7 Private Correspondence, Ga-Go, n.d.
  8 Private Correspondence, Gallagher, Catherine M. (friend, wife of inspector), 1901-1903
  9 Private Correspondence, Gallagher, Catherine, 1904-1906
  10 Private Correspondence, Gr-Gz, n.d.
Box Folder
154 1 Private Correspondence, Ha-Hz, n.d.
  2 Private Correspondence, Ia-Iz, n.d.
  3 Invitations, n.d.
  4 Private Correspondence, Ja-Jz, n.d.
  5 Private Correspondence, Ka-Kz, n.d.
  6 Private Correspondence, La-Lz, n.d.
  7 Private Correspondence, Ma-Me, n.d.
  8 Private Correspondence, McClelland, John, St. Catharine's, Ontario, Canada, 1898-1903
  9 Private Correspondence, Mi-Mz, n.d.
Box Folder
155 1 Private Correspondence, Na-Nz, n.d.
  2 Private Correspondence, Oa-Oz, n.d.
  3 Private Correspondence, Pa-Pz, n.d.
  4 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Emma Fickensher (second wife), 1922-1931
  5 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Emma Fickensher (second wife), 1932-1938
  6 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Hannah Dever(first wife), 1897-1899
  7 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Joseph (brother), 1897-1899
  8 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Joseph, 1900-1901
  9 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Joseph, 1902-1903
  10 Private Correspondence, Powderly, Margery (sister), 1901
  11 Private Correspondence, Powderly, P. J. (nephew), 1901-1903
Box Folder
156 1 Private Correspondence, Powderly, T. V., Jr. (nephew), 1897-1901
  2 Private Correspondence, Powderly, T. V., Jr. (nephew), 1902-1904
  3 Private Correspondence, Powderly, T. V., Jr. (nephew), 1907-1919
  4 Private Correspondence, Powderly Family, Miscellaneous, 1897-1899
  5 Private Correspondence, Ra-Rz, n.d.
  6 Private Correspondence, Sa-Sl, n.d.
  7 Private Correspondence, Sm-Sz, n.d.
  8 Private Correspondence, T-U-V, n.d.
  8 Private Correspondence, T-U-V, n.d.
  9 Private Correspondence, Wa-We, n.d.
  10 Private Correspondence, Wh-Wz-Y-Z, n.d.
  11 Private Correspondence, Miscellaneous, n.d.
Box Volume
157 70 Letter Press Copy Books, September 27, 1894-April 30, 1896
  71 Letter Press Copy Books, May 5, 1896-April 3, 1897
  72 Letter Press Copy Books, April 7, 1897-March 15, 1899
Box Volume
158 73 Letter Press Copy Books, June 12, 1899-June 29, 1900
  74 Letter Press Copy Books, July 7, 1900-May 11, 1901
  77 Letter Press Copy Books, August 12, 1897-January 23, 1901 (personal)
Box Volume
159 78 Letter Press Copy Books, January 24, 1901- December 31, 1901 (personal)
  79 Letter Press Copy Books, May 29, 1901-October 7, 1902 (personal)
  80 Letter Press Copy Books, January 3, 1902-January 21, 1903 (L. B. , A, )
Box Volume
160 81 Letter Press Copy Books, January 21, 1903- January 25, 1904 (L. B. , B, )
  82 Letter Press Copy Books, February 3, 1904-March 13, 1905 (L. B. , C, )
  83 Letter Press Copy Books, March 16, 1905-February 13, 1906 (L. B. , D, )
  84 Letter Press Copy Books, February 15, 1906-April 12, 1907
Subseries 2.2: Immigration Bureau, Information Division, Department of Commerce and Labor, 1883(1900-1922)1931 (8 boxes)
 
Box Reel
161-168 80-83 The order of the files no longer reflects the order of the microfilm items.
Box Folder
161 1 Annual Reports, Commissioner General of Immigration, 1895, 1897-1900
  2 Annual Reports, Commissioner General of Immigration, 1901-1902
  3 Annual Reports, Commissioner General of Immigration, 1904
  4 Annual Reports, Commissioner General of Immigration, 1905
  5 Annual Reports, Commissioners of Emigration of the State of New York, 1890
  6 Annual Reports, Superintendent of Immigration, 1892-1894
  7 Cases and Reports, 1895-1897
  8 Cases and Reports, 1898-1899
  9 Cases and Reports, 1900-1901
  10 Cases and Reports, 1902
  11 Cases and Reports, n.d.
  12 The Chinese and the Chinese Question, 1888
  13 Clippings and Articles, 1899-1918
Box Folder
162 1 Correspondence: A, 1904-1920
  2 Correspondence: B, 1906-1908
  3 Correspondence: B, 1909-1912
  4 Correspondence: B, 1917-1920
  5 Correspondence: C, 1903-1908
  6 Correspondence: C, 1908-1911
  7 Correspondence: C, 1912-1919
  8 Correspondence: C, 1919-1923
  9 Correspondence: D, 1907-1909
  10 Correspondence: D, 1911-1925
  11 Correspondence: E-F, 1903-1909, 1919-1921
  12 Correspondence: G, 1906-1908
  13 Correspondence: G, 1908-1910
  14 Correspondence: G, 1911-1923
  15 Correspondence: H, 1906-1908
  16 Correspondence: H, 1908-1909
  17 Correspondence: H, 1914-1921
  18 Correspondence: H, 1921-1929
  19 Correspondence: I-J, 1907-1918
  20 Correspondence: K, 1907-1910
  21 Correspondence: K, 1911-1910
  22 Correspondence: L, 1906-1921
  23 Correspondence: M-N, 1903-1908
  24 Correspondence: M-N, 1908-1909
Box Folder
163 1 Correspondence: M-N, 1911-1920
  2 Correspondence: M-N, 1921-1930
  3 Correspondence: O-P, 1906-1909
  4 Correspondence: O-P, 1912-1929
  5 Correspondence: Q, 1919
  6 Correspondence: R, 1902-1908
  7 Correspondence: R, 1908-1918
  8 Correspondence: R, 1918-1922
  9 Correspondence: S, 1905-1908
  10 Correspondence: S, 1908-1912
  11 Correspondence: S, 1913-1929
  12 Correspondence: T, 1907-1908
  13 Correspondence: T, 1909-1913, 1927
  14 Correspondence: U, 1907-1920
  15 Correspondence: W, 1906-1907
  16 Correspondence: W, 1908
  17 Correspondence: W, 1909-1916
  18 Correspondence: W, 1920-1923
  19 Correspondence: Miscellaneous, 1899, 1906-1924, n.d.
  20 Correspondence: Trip to Europe, 1906
  21 Correspondence: Trip to Europe, 1907
Box Folder
164 1 Diplomatic and Consular Officers Reports to Congress, 1889
  2 House of Representatives Testimony, 1888
  3 Immigration Statistics, 1900-1906
  4 Information for Immigrants, 1914, n.d.
  5 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc., 1888-1899
  6 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc., 1900-1903
  7 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc., 1905-1918
  8 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc., 1919-1931
Box Folder
165 1 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (1), n.d.
  2 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (2), n.d.
  3 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (3), n.d.
  4 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (4), n.d.
  5 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (5), n.d.
  6 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (6), n.d.
  7 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (7), n.d.
  8 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (8), n.d.
  9 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (9), n.d.
  10 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (10), n.d.
  11 Laws, Memoranda, Speeches, etc. (11), n.d.
  12 Legal Report, Luigi Graziano Case, 1900
  13 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 2/24-3/1/1900
  14 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/2-3/1900
Box Folder
166 1 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/5-9/1900
  2 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/10-14/1900
  3 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/14-19/1900
  4 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/20-22/1900
  5 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/23-28/1900
  6 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 3/29-31/1900
  7 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 4/2-4/1900
Box Folder
167 1 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 4/5-6/1900
  2 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 4/7-10/1900
  3 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 4/10-12/1900
  4 Legal Testimony, Luigi Graziano Case, 4/13-18/1900
  5 Letters to President Theodore Roosevelt re: Relieving Powderly as C.G. of Immigration, 1902
  6 Map of Petworth, D.C., n.d.
  7 Miscellaneous Letters, Reports, etc, 1904-1910
  8 Miscellaneous Letters, Reports, etc, 1917-1925
  9 Miscellaneous Letters, Reports, etc (1), n.d.
  10 Miscellaneous Letters, Reports, etc (2), n.d.
  11 Miscellaneous Notes, 1906, n.d.
  12 Miscellaneous Notes, n.d.
Box Folder
168 1 Official Report: "Alien Contract Laborers," 1892
  2 Poems and Prayers, 1909, n.d.
  3 Report re: Trip to Europe, 1906
  4 Report to the President of the Commission on Naturalization, 1905
  5 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports, ca. 1892
  6 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports, 1897-1899
  7 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports (1), 1899
  8 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports (2), 1899
  9 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports, 1899-1900
  10 Special Board of Inquiry Cases and Reports, 1900
  11 Treasury Department Reports to Congress, 1892-1900
  12 U.S. Department of Labor Division of Conciliation Credentials, 1921
  13 U.S. Passport Applications and Information, 1889, 1898, 1905
  14 U.S. Passport of Donald S. White, 1921
  15 Various Immigration Reports, 1895-1903
  16 Various Pamphlets, 1883-1896
  17 Various Pamphlets, Speeches, etc., 1898-1902, 1922
Subseries 2.3: Immigration and Labor, 1884(1887-1915)1922 (2 boxes)
Not on Microfilm. Boxes 222-223
Box Folder
222 1 Annual Reports, Chief of the Division of Information, 1908-1913
  2 Annual Reports, Chief of the Division of Information, 1914-1920
  3 Annual Reports, Commissioner-General of Immigration, 1899-1902
  4 Annual Reports, Commissioner-General of Immigration, 1909
  5 Annual Reports, Commissioner-General of Immigration, 1916
  6 'Board of Review' Poem, ca. 1900
  7 Clippings re: African Americans, ca. 1890s
  8 Clippings re: Appointment of Powderly as C.G. of Immigration, 1897
  9 Clippings re: Appointment of Powderly as C.G. of Immigration, "Unfriendly", 1897
  10 Clippings re: Armenia, 1898
  11 Clippings re: Armenia and Turkey, 1895
  12 Clippings re: The Boer War, ca. 1900
  13 Clippings re: Chinese, 1884-1895
  14 Clippings re: Chinese, 1900
  15 Clippings re: Chinese, 1901
  16 Clippings re: Chinese Leprosy, 1888-1890
  17 Clippings re: Congressional Immigration Committee Investigation, 1888
  18 Clippings re: Cuba, 1895-1896
  19 Clippings re: Cuba, Venezuela, Africa, etc., 1895-1898
  20 Clippings re: Immigration, 1887-1888
  21 Clippings re: Immigration, 1890-1892
  22 Clippings re: Immigration, 1897
  23 Clippings re: Immigration and Proposed Bills (1), ca. 1890-1905
  24 Clippings re: Immigration and Proposed Bills (2), ca. 1890-1905
  25 Clippings re: Italians and Hungarians, 1887-1890
  26 Clippings re: Jews, 1895
  27 Clippings re: Powderly as C.G. of Immigration, 1897-1898
  28 Clippings re: Powderly and Immigration, 1888-1892
  29 Clippings re: Removal of Powderly as C.G. of Immigration, 1902
  30 Clippings re: U.S.-Russia Extradition Treaty, 1903
  31 Clippings: Miscellaneous, ca. 1890-1905
  32 Commissioners of Immigration Report re: Causes of Immigration, 1892
  33 European Trip Diary, 1906
  34 Immigration Bills, 1902, 1906-1907
  35 Immigration Laws and Regulations, 1895-1903
  36 Immigration Laws and Regulations, 1906, 1920
Box Folder
223 1 Immigration Statistics, 1900
  2 Immigration Statistics, 1901-1904
  3 Immigration Statistics, 1906-1913
  4 Miscellaneous, 1906, n.d.
  5 Miscellaneous Notes, n.d.
  6 Pamphlets re: Exclusion of the Chinese, 1899-1903
  7 Pamphlets re: Exclusion of the Chinese, 1906-1915, n.d.
  8 Report of the Immigration Investigating Committee, 1895
  9 Travel Notes, 1906, 1910
  10 Various Pamphlets, 1903-1910, 1922, n.d.
                       
Series 3: Black Diamond Anthracite Coal Company, 1889(1901-1909)1916 (2 boxes)
The Black Diamond Anthracite Coal Company, was organized, with Powderly as President, in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, in 1902 and dissolved in 1909. This series has correspondence for 1902-1909, as well as reports and circulars for 1889-1903 that include the minutes of the company's organizational meeting, by-laws, first annual report, a prospectus, and an advertising pamphlet by Powderly.
Box Reel
169-170 84 The order of the files no longer reflects the order of the microfilm items.
Box Folder
169 1 Clippings and Articles, 1902, 1905, n.d.
  2 "Coal and a Coal Mine" Pamphlet, 1903
  3 Company Advertisements, ca. 1902
  4 Correspondence: A, 1902-1905
  5 Correspondence: B, 1901-1902
  6 Correspondence: B, 1902
  7 Correspondence: B, 1903-1904
  8 Correspondence: B, 1905-1907
  9 Correspondence: C, June-October 1902
  10 Correspondence: C, November-December 1902
  11 Correspondence: C, January-February 1903
  12 Correspondence: C, March-December 1903
  13 Correspondence: C, January-April 1903
  14 Correspondence: C, May-December 1904
  15 Correspondence: C, January-June 1905
  16 Correspondence: C, July 1905
  17 Correspondence: C, August 1905
  18 Correspondence: C, September-December 1905
  19 Correspondence: C, 1906, n.d.
  20 Correspondence: D, 1902-1906
  21 Correspondence: E, 1903-August 1905
  22 Correspondence: E, September 1905-1906, n.d.
  23 Correspondence: F, 1902-1908, 1916
  24 Correspondence: G, 1902-1906, n.d.
  25 Correspondence: H, 1902-1906
  26 Correspondence: J, 1902-1907
  27 Correspondence: K, 1902-1904, 1907
Box Folder
170 1 Correspondence: L, 1902-1906, n.d.
  2 Correspondence: M, 1902-1903
  3 Correspondence: M, 1905-1907
  4 Correspondence: N, 1902, 1905
  5 Correspondence: O, 1902-1905, 1915, n.d.
  6 Correspondence: P, 1902-1905
  7 Correspondence: R, 1902-1906
  8 Correspondence: S, 1902-1907
  9 Correspondence: T, 1902
  10 Correspondence: T, February-October 1905
  11 Correspondence: T, November-December 1905
  12 Correspondence: T, 1906
  13 Correspondence: W, 1901-1902
  14 Correspondence: W, 1903-1904
  15 Correspondence: W, January-August 1905
  16 Correspondence: W, September-November 1905
  17 Correspondence: W, 1906-1909
  18 Correspondence: Miscellaneous (1), ca. 1902-1908
  19 Correspondence: Miscellaneous (2), n.d.
  20 Maps and Photographs, 1904, n.d.
  21 Memoranda and Reports, 1889, 1902-1905
  22 Miscellaneous, 1902-1906, n.d.
  23 State of New Jersey Incorporation Documents, ca. 1900-1902
  24 Various Pamphlets, 1889, 1905, n.d.
                       
Series 4: Personal Papers, 1866-1937 (17 boxes)
The microfilmed section has general correspondence and notes, notebooks, calendars, account books, legal correspondence, and mostly undated drafts and copies of addresses, poems, and memorandums. Materials not microfilmed contain legal documents from before Powderly was a lawyer as well as files and papers from his legal career in Scranton and Washington, 1893-1912. There are also financial records, including account books, ledgers, receipts, and bills as well as European travel notes dated 1906 and 1910, calling cards, address books, memberships, and the correspondence and text for Powderly's manuscript autobiography.
Box Reel
171-178 85-90 The order of the files no longer reflects the order of the microfilm items.
Box Folder
171 1 Articles, Speeches, Etc., 1880-1924
  2 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (1), n.d.
  3 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (2), n.d.
  4 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (3), n.d.
  5 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (4), n.d.
  6 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (5), n.d.
  7 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (6), n.d.
  8 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (7), n.d.
  9 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (8), n.d.
  10 Articles, Speeches, Etc. (9), n.d.
Box Folder
172 1 General Correspondence, January-June 1904
  2 General Correspondence, July-December 1904
  3 General Correspondence, January-June 1905
  4 General Correspondence, July-October 1905
  5 General Correspondence, November-December 1905
  6 General Correspondence, January-February 1906
  7 General Correspondence, March-April 1906
  8 General Correspondence, May-July 1906
Box Folder
173 1 General Correspondence, August-December 1906
  2 General Correspondence, 1907
  3 General Correspondence, 1908
  4 General Correspondence, 1909-1911
  5 General Correspondence, 1912-1913
  6 General Correspondence, 1914-1916
  7 General Correspondence, 1917-1919
  8 General Correspondence, 1920-1922
  9 General Correspondence, 1922-1924
  10 General Correspondence, n.d.
  11 Legal Correspondence: A, 1895, 1897
  12 Legal Correspondence: B, 1884-1897, 1900-1902, 1907
Box Folder
174 1 Legal Correspondence: C, 1894-1897, 1900-1905
  2 Legal Correspondence: D, 1887-1897, 1918
  3 Legal Correspondence: E, 1895-1897
  4 Legal Correspondence: F, 1894-1897, 1905-1914
  5 Legal Correspondence: G, 1885, 1893-1897
  6 Legal Correspondence: H, 1892-1897, 1911
  7 Legal Correspondence: J, 1894-1897, 1900-1901, 1906
  8 Legal Correspondence: K, 1886, 1894-1897
  9 Legal Correspondence: L, 1893-1898, 1921
  10 Legal Correspondence: M, 1893-1898, 1900-1903
  11 Legal Correspondence: N, 1895-1896
  12 Legal Correspondence: O, 1895-1897, 1902-1904
  13 Legal Correspondence: P-Q, 1884, 1895-1898
Box Folder
175 1 Legal Correspondence: R, 1887-1888, 1894-1897, 1901-1903
  2 Legal Correspondence: S, 1894-1900, 1914
  3 Legal Correspondence: T, 1893-1897, 1901
  4 Legal Correspondence: U-Z, 1895-1897, 1908
  5 Legal Correspondence: Miscellaneous, 1883-1884, 1895, n.d.
  6 Legal Correspondence: Alleman Law Company, 1895-1896
  7 Legal Correspondence: Brown Estate, 1895-1897
  8 Legal Correspondence: Canaran Pension Claim, 1894-1897
  9 Legal Correspondence: Hale Estate (1), 1903-1904
  10 Legal Correspondence: Hale Estate (2), 1904
Box Folder
176 1 Legal Correspondence: Hale Estate (3), 1904-1906
  2 Legal Correspondence: Kellow Pension Claim, 1878, 1891-1897, 1901
  3 Legal Correspondence: Marion Pension Claim, 1891-1896
  4 Legal Correspondence: Mullaney Pension Claim, 1895
  5 Legal Correspondence: O'Donnell Policies, 1895-1896
  6 Legal Reports and Documents, 1875-1895
  7 Memoranda and Reports, 1880, 1885, 1896, n.d.
  8 Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1890-1904
  9 Miscellaneous Notes (1), n.d.
  10 Miscellaneous Notes (2), n.d.
Box Folder
177 1 Miscellaneous Notes (3), n.d.
  2 Miscellaneous Notes (4), n.d.
  3 Miscellaneous Notes (5), n.d.
  4 Miscellaneous Notes (6), n.d.
  5 Miscellaneous Notes (7), n.d.
  6 Miscellaneous Notes (8), n.d.
  7 Poems, n.d.
Box Folder
178 1 Membership Roll, Labor Reform Union No. 215, ca. 1870s
  2 Notebook, ca. 1891
  3 Notebook, ca. 1898
  4 Notebook, ca. 1904
  5 Notebook, ca. 1905
  6 Portfolio, ca. 1898
  7 Powderly Diaries, 1869-1870
  8 Powderly Diaries, 1871-1872
  9 Powderly Diaries, 1873-1874
  10 Powderly Diaries, 1874
  11 Powderly Diaries, 1875-1876
  12 Powderly Diaries, 1877
  13 Powderly Diaries, 1878-1879
  14 Powderly Diaries, 1882-1883
  15 Powderly Diaries, 1885, 1890
  16 Stenographer's Notebook, ca. 1901
Box  
219   Legal Documents, 1866-1906
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
220   Legal Documents, 1866-1906
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
221   Case Books, Depositions, and Dockets, 1895-1912
        Not on Microfilm
    Court Publications, 1886-1904
        Not on Microfilm
    General Legal Materials, 1893-1900
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
224   Dever-Powderly Business, 1881-1900
        Not on Microfilm
    Real Estate, Mining, Banking, 1879-1937
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
225   Real Estate, Mining, Banking, 1879-1937
        Not on Microfilm
    Small Account Books, ca. 1875-1900
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
227   General Personal Materials, ca. 1875-1920
        Not on Microfilm
    Manuscript: Autobiography, "The Path I Trod," Notes, Correspondence, and Text, ca. 1875-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
228   Manuscript: Autobiography, "The Path I Trod," Notes, Correspondence, and Text, ca. 1875-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
229   Small Diaries and Notes, ca. 1875-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
230   Calling Cards, Address Books, Memberships, ca. 1875-1920
        Not on Microfilm
                       
Series 5: Printed Material, ca. 1870-1937 (35 boxes)
The microfilmed material has Knights of Labor pamphlets, including Powderly's speeches and reports on meetings of local and district assemblies. The non microfilmed material, including oversized items, has various newspaper clippings, as well as general, labor, political, and religious pamphlets. In addition there are miscellaneous scrapbooks.
Box Reel
179-199 91 Printed Material, 1882-1898
Box  
231-234   Chronological Newspaper Clippings, 1873-1935
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
234-236   Topical Newspaper Clippings, ca. 1880-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
237   Miscellaneous Newspaper Clippings, ca. 1880-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
238-239   General Pamphlets, Clippings, Scrapbooks, ca. 1870-1920
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
239   Labor Pamphlets, Clippings, Scrapbooks, 1895-1929
        Not on Microfilm
    Political Pamphlets, Clippings, Scrapbooks, ca. 1880-1920
        General Politics (ca. 1880-1920), Pennsylvania Politics (1895-1916), Silver Question Politics (1892-1896)
        Not on Microfilm
    Religion Pamphlets, Clippings, Scrapbooks, 1903-1912
        Not on Microfilm
    Irish Material Pamphlets, Clippings, Scrapbooks, 1884-1900
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
240   Miscellaneous, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
    Politics, 1880s-1920
        Not on Microfilm
    Pennsylvania, 1895-1916
        Not on Microfilm
    The Silver Question, 1892-1896
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
260   Journal of United Labor (Oversize), 1887-1889
        Not on Microfilm
    Journal of the Knights of Labor (Oversize), 1889-1890
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
261   Journal of the Knights of Labor (Oversize), 1890-1891
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
262   Journal of the Knights of Labor (Oversize), 1891-1892
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
263   Journal of the Knights of Labor (Oversize), 1893-1896
        Not on Microfilm
    The Plate Printer, Official Organ of The International Steel and Copper Plate Printers' Union of North America (Oversize), 1905-1907
        Not on Microfilm
Oversize  
Map case   Miscellaneous Newsprint Publications, 1905-1937, n.d.
                       
Series 6: Miscellaneous Files, 1886-1937 (3 boxes)
The microfilmed material consists of five folders, with the first having a transcript of a talk between a Mr. Sinexon and Powderly, the second and third containing undated Powderly speeches and poems, the fourth with miscellaneous Powderly correspondence, and the fifth with correspondence and clippings regarding the Knights of Labor and the Catholic Church. There are 25 oversized documents, 1 map, and 6 drawings/sketches/prints stored in an oversize map case drawer.
Box Reel
200 92 Miscellaneous Files, 1886-1937
Box  
201   Miscellaneous Files, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
230   Miscellaneous Correspondence and Old Box Cards, 1897-1930
        Not on Microfilm
Oversize  
Map Case   Documents, Maps, 1897-1930
        Not on Microfilm
                       
Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1873-1904 (13 boxes)
A selection of clippings scrapbooks, arranged chronologically with some overlap, relating specifically to Powderly, the Knights of Labor, and Immigration issues, with gaps for some years.
Box Reel
201-213 93 Scrapbooks, 1873-1904
                       
Series 8: Photographs, n.d. (12 boxes, 1 file cabinet, 1 map case drawer)
The first part of this series has a file cabinet and boxes of information sheets and contact prints encompassing the thousands of photographic images produced ca. 1902-1921 by Powderly. They were originally glass and nitrate based negatives and glass lantern slides that were converted, with the support of a NEH grant, to safety film with reference prints and a card index. Included are large print copies used in a 1977 exhibit on Ellis Island. The second part consists of numerous photos given to or collected by Powderly during his long career in labor and government. A selection of 32 numbered photographs were microfilmed as part of this project in the 1970s while, more recently, over 300 of these were digitized and created for The Terence Vincent Powderly Photographic Prints Digital Collection sponsored by the Washington Research Libraries Consortium (WRLC). In addition, there are miscellaneous, duplicate, and unprocessed photographs as well.
Oversize  
FC 1   Photographs by TVP, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
242-243   Photographs: Information Sheets, Contact Prints by TVP, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
Oversize  
252-253   Photographs by TVP, 1977 Ellis Island Exhibit, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
Box Reel
No Box 94 Photographs collected by TVP, n.d.
Box  
244-249   Photographs collected by TVP, 2002 Digital Collection, n.d.
Box  
250-251, 254   Photographs collected by TVP, Miscellaneous Duplicates and Unprocessed, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
Oversize  
Map case   Photographs collected by TVP, Misc, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm
                       
Series 9: Mayor of Scranton Administrative Records, 1872(1877-1883)1916 (2 boxes)
A variety of items related to Powderly's tenure as mayor of Scranton, Pennsylvania, including a bail docket (1879-1880), docket of municipal records (1878-1879), annual report (1879), cash book (1877-1878), district voter list (ca. 1880), a Scranton Centennial printed journal (1916), oversized scrapbooks, and some undated postcards.
Box  
226   General, 1872(1877-1883)1916
        Not on Microfilm
Box  
264   Scrapbooks (Oversize), 1876-1879
        Not on Microfilm
                       
Series 10: Memorabilia, Artifacts, and Antique Books n.d. (6 boxes)
Miscellaneous items, including inscribed books as well as engraved wood blocks with Powderly's image or name.
Box  
241, 255-259   Memorabilia and Artifacts, n.d.
        Not on Microfilm

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Biographical Note

Scope and Contents

Arrangement

Restrictions

Administrative Information

Related Material

Index Terms

Select Bibliography

Detailed Description of the Collection

Series 1: Knights of Labor 1864-1924

Series 2: Immigration and Labor, 1883-1931

Series 3: Black Diamond Anthracite Coal Company, 1889(1901-1909)1916

Series 4: Personal Papers, 1866-1937

Series 5: Printed Material, ca. 1870-1937

Series 6: Miscellaneous Files, 1886-1937

Series 7: Scrapbooks, 1873-1904

Series 8: Photographs, n.d.

Series 9: Mayor of Scranton Administrative Records, 1872(1877-1883)1916

Series 10: Memorabilia, Artifacts, and Antique Books n.d.

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