The Catholic University of America

Harry Cyril Read

An inventory of the Harry Cyril Read Papers at The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives


Contact Information:

Mailing Address: The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064

Telephone: 202-319-5065

Email: lib-archives@cua.edu

URL: http://archives.lib.cua.edu/

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Descriptive Summary

Repository: The Catholic University of America, The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives
Creator: Harry Cyril Read, 1892-1957
Title: The Harry Cyril Read Papers
Dates: 1917-1968
Extent: 15.4 linear feet; 22 boxes
Abstract: The Harry Cyril Read Papers contain correspondence, subject files, manuscripts, research material, printed material, and photographs largely documenting his writing efforts and his positions with labor organizations.
Collection Number: ACUA 013
Language: English

Biographical Note

Harry Cyril Read was born on May 13, 1892, in Chicago, Illinois, to Harry Carleton and Margaret Ann (Griffin) Read. He attended Chicago grade schools and later worked on a business degree at Northwestern University from 1919 to 1921. Prior to his higher education work, he served in the United States Army during World War I as a Sergeant Major of the 346th Tank Battalion. After returning from the war, he married Mary Sue Kain on December 10, 1918. They had three children: Harry Carleton, John Kain, and Mary Sue. After the death of his wife in 1928, he married Lucia Florence Jennings on February 23, 1938.

As a newspaperman for nearly three decades, Read worked as both a reporter and an editor. His newspaper career began in 1912 when he worked as a reporter for the Cheyenne Leader in Cheyenne, Wyoming. He did not remain in Wyoming long and, in July 1912, returned to Chicago where he worked for The Pullman Company and The Chicago Bridge and Iron Company before returning to the journalism field in 1916 as a reporter for the Chicago Daily Journal. He continued to work for the Chicago Daily Journal after returning from World War I until 1919 when he accepted a position at the C. E. Thomas Publishing Company. He worked there until 1920 when he formed an advertising service partnership, which lasted until 1921 when Read became a reporter for the Chicago American, one of two Chicago newspapers owned by William Randolph Hearst. The Chicago American first went to press in 1900 as an evening newspaper with the other Hearst newspaper, the Chicago Examiner, beginning publication in 1902 as a morning paper. By the time Read began as a reporter for the Chicago American, Hearst had bought the Chicago Herald in 1918 creating the Herald-Examiner, which, with the Chicago American, became two of the most successful daily newspapers in Chicago with a circulation of about 300,000.

After working as a reporter for four years, Read became the editor of the Chicago American in 1926 during some of the most intense crime in Chicago and United States history. Chicago had always had a violent reputation and the statistics to back that claim, but the 1920s proved to be unusually bloody primarily as a result of competition over illegal liquor distribution during the Prohibition Era. Read carried on the tradition of aggressive newsgathering by the Chicago American by forming a relationship with Al Capone, one of the most notorious gangsters in Chicago and the country at the time. Read left the Chicago American in 1932 to publish his own newspaper, the Northwest Sun, but returned as the night editor for the Herald-Examiner in 1934.

By the 1930s, the CIO-affiliated American Newspaper Guild had organized Local 71, the Chicago Newspaper Guild, and negotiated generous contracts, which had become difficult for Hearst to honor by the late 1930s as advertising revenues failed to recover from the effects of the Depression and the price of newsprint increased. After layoffs in both of the Hearst Chicago newspapers, the guild called for a strike that began on December 4, 1938. As a significant guild member, Read was included in a suit filed by the Hearst papers to restrain strike activity in February 1939, and his wife was arrested for assaulting a police officer that same year. By the time the strike ended in April 1940, the two Hearst newspapers had been merged into the Chicago Herald-American. Read did not return to his former job, but his experience with the labor movement led to positions in several labor-affiliated newspapers including the United Auto Worker, the Wage Earner (a Catholic-related publication as well), and as editor of the Michigan CIO News.

In 1945, Read and his wife moved to Washington, D.C., when he accepted a job as Assistant to the Secretary-Treasurer of the CIO, James B. Carey. In this capacity, Read represented the union at the United Nations Conference for International Organization in San Francisco in 1948 and at the World Federation of Trade Unions in Rome in 1948. While in Rome, Pope Pius XII received him in private audience. Read had been involved with Catholic-related groups as a member of the Association of Catholic Trade Unionists, the Catholic Economic Association, the Catholic Labor Alliance, and the Catholic Inter-racial Council. In addition to his work with Catholic organizations, he also became more active on health and safety committees in Washington, D.C. and was recognized posthumously by the National Safety Council, which established the Harry Read Memorial. Read worked as Carey's assistant until the 1955 merger of the AFL-CIO when he became the assistant to William F. Schnizler, the Secretary-Treasurer of the AFL-CIO.

Read's writing career was not limited to the pages of newspapers. Early in his career with the C. E. Thomas Company, he co-authored two books, History of World War I and Woodrow Wilson, Life and Works. In the 1930s, he researched and wrote extensively on crime and politics, especially Al Capone, and later turned to the subject of parliamentary procedure in the 1940s. The House of Whispering Hate, a book about the prison experience at Leavenworth in Kansas, was published in 1932 with Read as a co-author. He self-published Manual of Parliamentary Law in 1941 and provided that work as a resource to assist the labor community with conducting meetings and negotiating with management. His wife, Lucy Read, continued to promote her husband's work after his death on November 22, 1957.

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Scope and Contents

The Harry Cyril Read Papers contain correspondence, subject files, manuscripts, research material, printed material, and photographs largely documenting his writing efforts and his positions with labor organizations. The bulk of the professional correspondence and subject files in Series 1 spans from Read's position as editor of the Michigan CIO News in the early 1940s to his work with the AFL-CIO a few years before his death in 1957. Important subjects include communism, race relations, international affairs, and Catholic organizations, such as the National Catholic Welfare Conference. There are also many files with correspondence from and about significant figures in the labor movement and the Catholic Church, with an emphasis on the United States. Significant labor figures in this series include James B. Carey, whom Read worked for at the CIO, and Phillip Murray, president of the CIO during much of Read's time there. One folder contains correspondence with Catholic Clergy, such as Mgsr. George Higgins. Of particular interest is the large amount of material on the Mary-Carter Roberts case, a lawsuit over an alleged unjust job termination that involved the CIO. This series also includes the appointment books of Harry Read during his time in the CIO and AFL-CIO.

Series 2: Writings and Research Materials largely consists of Read's manuscript revisions in the 1930s and 1940s and his detailed research of crime. This series contains material related to Harry Read's writing and research. Box 5 consists of correspondence related to publishing efforts of specific titles. Note that if a title in the folder heading is followed by other titles in parentheses, that indicates that there were working titles, and the title used is the one from the most polished manuscript. There is also a folder with correspondence between Lucy Read and publishing representatives regarding her attempts to publish Harry Read's work after he died. Boxes 6 through 13 consist mainly of the manuscripts in various stages of editing, particularly Read's work on Al Capone. The subjects of other works include fingerprinting and politics. Most are works of fiction based on actual events. "The Way of the Jungle" is perhaps the most fictionalized work in that one of the characters is a talking chimpanzee. There is not much of Read's work as a journalist, but one folder does contain a series of articles he wrote in 1937 in the Herald and Examiner about the difficulty older workers face finding jobs. Also, Read discusses his career as a newspaperman on some of the radio program scripts. There are also several poems apparently authored by Read. The only manuscript not authored by Read is "Shake Sucker." Boxes 13 through 18 contain research files used to write many of Read's works, especially crime in Chicago. Included in this part of the series are compilations of crime news and transcripts of court proceedings and police surveillance. Of particular interest is X Marks the Spot, a rare crime book on gang violence published in 1930. Also, there is an account of the Levee crackdown in the 1910s. Read created a numbering system for the research that corresponded to the alphabet. This arrangement was retained with the numbers included in parentheses following the letter on the folder heading. Generally, the numbers without decimal points have more general subjects that start with the letter, such as M (931) that contains the subject of murder. Those numbers with decimal points indicate research on specific people whose last names began with that letter, such as the folder with C (903.2) that contains information on Al Capone.

The printed material in Series 3 contains texts owned by Read as well as materials that overlap his personal and professional interests, such as Catholic social justice. This series consists of several texts owned by Read, and at least one, Notes for English, he probably used at Northwestern University as a student in the early 1920s. The issue of the Journal of American Genealogy contains information on the Read family name. The clippings and pamphlets relate to subjects covered in Series 1 and Series 2, although they were either not part of the numbering system Read used for research, or they were not found with the rest of the professional correspondence and subject files. The clippings and pamphlets cover subjects such as labor, Catholicism, and international affairs.

The personal correspondence in Series 4 consists of many letters between Read and his second wife and children mostly from the 1930s to the 1950s. After Read's death, his wife continued to correspond with the children. The financial records in Series 4 consist largely of tax notices and receipts that trace the whereabouts of Read and his wife from the 1920s to the 1950s. Particularly interesting are the letters between Read and his children when they are in college. There are also some letters in which Read discusses his jobs. After Read's death in 1957, his wife continued to communicate with the children and these letters and cards have been placed in a separate folder. There are also two folders of personal financial records that document the residence of Harry and Lucy Read from Chicago in the late 1920s to Washington, D.C., in the 1950s. The folders also contain records of stock ownership and various tax receipts.

Series 5 consists of photographs, photocopies, and watercolors. The photographs consist of prints from Read's visit with Al Capone in Cuba in 1930 as well as prints and snapshots of family and friends. There is also a folder of professionally related photographs, many from Read's time with the national labor organizations. Some of the photograph folders have been titled based upon the book in which Read planned to use them as illustrations. The Hearst strike photographs document the tense situation of the picket lines and also include shots of Lucy Read's arrest. The professional photographs include a shot of Harry Read standing behind U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower in the oval office, and a shot of Read attending the final CIO meeting in New York City. There is also a shot of U.S. President Harry Truman unveiling the Franklin D. Roosevelt Plaque at Georgetown University. The personal photographs contain shots of Read, Lucy Read, and Read's children as well as photographs of various relatives and friends. The photographs range in size from 2"x3" to 8"x10". The series also includes two 5"x7" watercolors by an unknown artist.

Series 6 consists of eleven maps and broadsides related to Read's writing and research on crime and parliamentary law. These were transferred to oversize storage. There are several road maps of the Chicago and the Midwest region with notations that may have been made by Read. Of particular interest is a map of Chicago from 1928 identifying specific crimes.

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Arrangement

The Harry Cyril Read Papers consists of six series:







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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

There are no access restrictions.

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Administrative Information

Acquisition Information

Donated by the Harry Read family in 1958.

Processing Information

The Papers of Harry Read had been processed prior to 2005. During reprocessing, professional correspondence and subject files were further consolidated under folder headings that had already been established or placed under headings that corresponded to Read's professional career. The research files were arranged according to the numbering system Read had apparently used. The original processor had completed this to some extent already. Some additional weeding took place with materials that had no relevance to the collection, such as clippings collected by Read's wife after he died. There were several maps of Chicago and the Midwest region that did not have any notations that were also discarded.

Processing completed in October 2005 by Jordan Patty. EAD markup completed in October 2005 by Jordan Patty. EAD revisions in 2013 by Michael J. Dobbs. Additional revisions and EAD markup completed in 2017 by Shane T. MacDonald.

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Related Material

The American Catholic History Research Center and University Archives:

The Records of the Congress of Industrial Organizations

The John Cort Papers

The George G. Higgins Papers

The Phillip Murray Papers

The Records of the National Catholic Welfare Conference

The Catholic University Mullen Library:

Wage Earner (Michigan labor newspaper)Catalog Record

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Index Terms

This record series is indexed under the following controlled access subject terms.


Persons:
Read, Harry
Read, Lucy

Organizations:
American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations
Congress of Industrial Organizations

Family Names:
Read Family

Places:
Chicago (Ill.)
Washington (D.C.)

Subjects:
Crime
Journalism
Organized Labor
Politics
Publishing


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Selected Introductory Bibliography on Harry Cyril Read

MacDonald, Shane T. 'Read All About It – From Crime Reporter to Labor Advocate,' The Archivist's Nook. May 4, 2017.

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Detailed Description of the Collection

                       
Series 1: Professional Correspondence and Subject Files, 1927-1960 (4 boxes)
This series consists largely of materials relating to Read's work with the CIO in the 1940s and the 1950s.
Folders are arranged both alphabetically and chronologically.
Box Folder
1 1 American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Labor (AFL-CIO), 1955-1957
  2 Appointment Books, 1946-1947
  3 Appointment Books, 1948-1949
  4 Appointment Books, 1950-1951
  5 Appointment Books, 1952-1956
  6 Association of Catholic Trade Unions (ACTU), 1941-1955
  7 Authors League of America, 1943-1955
Box Folder
2 1 Carey, James B., 1953-1955
  2 Catholic Clergy, 1941-1943
  3 Catholic Interracial Council, 1946-1955
  4 Catholic Labor Alliance, 1948-1955
  5 Communist Party, 1944-1950
         
  6 Communist Party, 1950-1954
         
  7 Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), 1945-1949
Box Folder
3 1 Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), 1950-1953
  2 Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO), 1954-1955
  3 Cronin, John F., 1945-1948
  4 Delta Sigma Pi, 1935-1956
  5 General, 1927-1940
  6 Georgetown University Roosevelt Memorial, 1945-1949
  7 Michigan CIO News, 1941-1945
  8 Murray, Phillip, 1946-1955
Box Folder
4 1 National Catholic Welfare Conference (NCWC), 1948-1955
  2 O'Boyle, Patrick J., 1952-1953
  3 O'Hara, Barratt, 1954
  4 Read, Harry Cyril, 1935, 1952-1960
  5 Roberts, Mary-Carter, 1947-1948
  6 Sachs, Lou Mamlok, 1952-1954
  7 Tucker, Irwin St. John, 1939
  8 Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), ca. 1941-1953
  9 United Nations, 1944-1955
Box Folder
5 1 United Transport Service Employees of America (UTSEA), 1942
  2 Weber, Paul, 1946
  3 World Federation of Trade Unions (WFTU) - Rome Meeting, 1948
                       
Series 2: Writings and Research, 1918-1960, n.d. (14 boxes)
This series contains material related to Harry Read's writing and research. Note that if a title in the folder heading is followed by other titles in parentheses, that indicates that there were working titles, and the title used is the one from the most polished manuscript. Read created a numbering system for the research that corresponded to the alphabet. This arrangement was retained with the numbers included in parentheses following the letter on the folder heading. Generally, the numbers without decimal points have more general subjects that start with the letter, such as M (931) that contains the subject of murder. Those numbers with decimal points indicate research on specific people whose last names began with that letter, such as the folder with C (903.2) that contains information on Al Capone.
The arrangement begins with correspondence, then writings, and finally research. The folders are then arranged alphabetically by folder heading, and then chronologically.
Box Folder
5 4 Correspondence, Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend), 1932-1956
  5 Correspondence, Copyright, 1941-1959
  6 Correspondence, House of Whispering Hate, 1932
  7 Correspondence, Manual of Parliamentary Law, 1941-1959
  8 Correspondence, Publication Documents, ca. 1930s
  9 Correspondence, Read, Lucy, 1958-1960
  10 Correspondence, The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee), 1935
Box Folder
6 1 As a Citizen and Taxpayer #595, 1938
  2 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1930s
  3 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1930s
  4 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend), 1940s-1950s
  5 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1944
  6 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1944
  7 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1945
Box Folder
7 1 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1945
  2 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1957
  3 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1957
  4 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1958
  5 Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1958
  6 Chicago Herald and Examiner, 1937
  7 Don't Cash That Check, ca. 1930s
Box Folder
8 1 Economics, ca. 1935
  2 Ex Angel #587, ca. 1930s
  3 Front Page Frolics, 1938
  4 House of Whispering Hate, 1931
  5 Let's All Go on Record (1), 1930-1942
  6 Let's All Go on Record (2), 1930-1942
  7 Manual of Parliamentary Law (1), 1941
  8 Manual of Parliamentary Law (2), 1941
Box Folder
9 1 Manual of Parliamentary Law, ca. 1945
  2 Manual of Parliamentary Law (1), ca. 1955
  3 Manual of Parliamentary Law (2), ca. 1955
  4 Manual of Parliamentary Law (1), ca. 1959
  5 Manual of Parliamentary Law (2), ca. 1959
Box Folder
10 1 Manual of Parliamentary Law, 24 Lesson Outline Course (1), ca. 1940s-1950s
  2 Manual of Parliamentary Law, 24 Lesson Outline Course (2), ca. 1940s-1950s
  3 Manual of Parliamentary Law, Clippings (1), 1944-1945
  4 Manual of Parliamentary Law, Clippings (2), 1944-1945
  5 Manual of Parliamentary Law, Clippings and Typescripts (1), 1944-1945
  6 Manual of Parliamentary Law, Clippings and Typescripts (2), 1944-1945
Box Folder
11 1 Manual of Parliamentary Law, Clippings and Typescripts, 1945
  2 Moscow's Civil Liberties Racket #591, ca. 1940
  3 The Mystery of the Thirty Dead Ducks, ca. 1940
  4 Old Lothario Goes Berserk, 1940
  5 Poetry, n.d.
  6 Radio Programs, 1931-1935
         
  7 Radio Programs, 1936-1937
         
  8 Shake Sucker #591, ca. 1930s
  9 Speeches, 1946-1948
  10 Speeches, 1948-1953
Box Folder
12 1 Uncle Sam Should Know You, ca. 1935
  2 Untitled Typescript, ca. 1930s
  3 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee), ca. 1935
  4 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (1), ca. 1940
  5 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (2), ca. 1940
  6 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (1), ca. 1958
Box Folder
13 1 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (2), ca. 1958
  2 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (1), ca. 1960
  3 The Way of the Jungle (Ward Committeeman, Jim Panzee) (2), ca. 1960
  4 Research Subject Files, A (901), 1937-1938
  5 Research Subject Files, A (901.1), 1925-1928
  6 Research Subject Files, B (902-902.1), 1923-1927
  7 Research Subject Files, C (903-903.1), 1936-1939
Box Folder
14 1 Research Subject Files, C (903.2), 1929-1932
  2 Research Subject Files, C (903.3), 1931-1939
  3 Research Subject Files, C (903.4), 1926-1928
  4 Research Subject Files, D (904-904.1), 1920s-1937
  5 Research Subject Files, E (905), 1936-1938
  6 Research Subject Files, E (905.1), 1920s-1936
  7 Research Subject Files, F (906), 1937-1938
  8 Research Subject Files, F (906.1-906.2), 1920s-1936
  9 Research Subject Files, G (907.1), 1920s-1931
Box Folder
15 1 Research Subject Files, G (907.2), 1916-1931
  2 Research Subject Files, G (907.4), 1920s-1943
  3 Research Subject Files, H (908-908.1), 1920s-1939
  4 Research Subject Files, I (909), 1937
  5 Research Subject Files, J (910-910.1), ca. 1925-1938
  6 Research Subject Files, K (911-911.1), 1925-1931
Box Folder
16 1 Research Subject Files, L (912), 1930-1937
  2 Research Subject Files, L (912-912.1), 1930-1937
  3 Research Subject Files, L (912.4), ca. 1921-1932
  4 Research Subject Files, L (912.5), ca. 1938
  5 Research Subject Files, M (913), 1934-1938
  6 Research Subject Files, M (913.1), 1920-1939
Box Folder
17 1 Research Subject Files, M (913.2), 1920-1932
  2 Research Subject Files, M (913.3), 1937
  3 Research Subject Files, N (914), 1931-1938
  4 Research Subject Files, O (915-915.1), 1920s-1937
  5 Research Subject Files, P (916-916.1), 1918-1938
  6 Research Subject Files, R (918-918.2), 1932-1937
  7 Research Subject Files, R (918.1), ca. 1920s
  8 Research Subject Files, S (919-919.1), 1920s-1938
  9 Research Subject Files, T (920-920.2), 1920s-1930s
  10 Research Subject Files, U (921), 1920s
  11 Research Subject Files, W (923), 1918-1937
Box Folder
18 1 Research Subject Files, W (923.1-923.2), 1920s-1934
  2 Research Subject Files, X (924), 1930
  3 Research Subject Files, Z (926), 1920s-1951
                       
Series 3: Printed Material, 1920-1960 (1 box)
This series consists of several texts owned by Read. The clippings and pamphlets relate to subjects covered in Series 1 and Series 2, although they were either not part of the numbering system Read used for research, or they were not found with the rest of the professional correspondence and subject files.
This series is arranged alphabetically by folder title.
Box Folder
18 4 Clippings, 1932-1960
  5 International Training Administration, 1940
  6 Journal of American Genealogy, 1921
  7 Labor School Notes (1), ca. 1940
  8 Labor School Notes (2), ca. 1940
  9 Labor School Notes (3), ca. 1940
Box Folder
19 1 Notes for English, 1920
  2 Pamphlets, 1931-1956
                       
Series 4: Personal Correspondence and Financial Records, 1922-1968, n.d. (3 boxes)
This series consists largely of correspondence between Harry Read and his wife Lucy and his children from the 1930s to the 1950s.
The series is arranged by subject, then chronologically.
Box Folder
19 3 Personal Correspondence, 1922-1928, n.d.
  4 Personal Correspondence, 1930-1939
  5 Personal Correspondence, 1940-1941
  6 Personal Correspondence (1), 1941-1943
  7 Personal Correspondence (2), 1941-1943
Box Folder
20 1 Personal Correspondence, 1943-1944
  2 Personal Correspondence, 1945
  3 Personal Correspondence (1), 1946-1949
  4 Personal Correspondence (2), 1946-1949
Box Folder
21 1 Personal Correspondence, 1950-1953
  2 Personal Correspondence, 1954-1956
  3 Personal Correspondence, Read, Lucy, 1957-1968
  4 Financial Records, 1926-1956
  5 Financial Records, 1937-1947
                       
Series 5: Images, 1917-1957, n.d. (1 box)
Series 5 consists of photographs, photocopies, and watercolors. Some of the photograph folders have been titled based upon the book in which Read planned to use them as illustrations. The photographs range in size from 2"x3" to 8"x10". The series also includes two 5"x7" watercolors by an unknown artist.
The images are arranged by subject, then chronologically.
Box Folder
22 1 Photographs, Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (1), ca. 1930
  2 Photographs, Capone As I Knew Him (Days of Prohibition, City in a Garden, Voters are Kings, It Can Happen Again, That Man Capone, Al Capone - My Friend) (2), ca. 1930
  3 Photographs, Hearst Strike, 1939
  4 Photographs, Let's All Go On Record, ca. 1930s
  5 Photographs, Personal, 1917-1956
  6 Photographs, Professional, 1945-1957
  7 Photographs, Uncle Sam Should Know You, ca. 1930s
  8 Watercolors, n.d.
                       
Series 6: Oversize Materials, 1928-1940s
This series consists of eleven oversize items from the collection. These materials have been transferred to the Oversize Collection and filed under Read, Harry.
Box Folder
Map case 1 Parliamentary Law Charts n.d.
        Originally located in box 5, folder 4.
  2 Distellary Drawing n.d.
        Originally located in box 13, folder 4.
  3 Crime Map ca. 1928
        Originally located in box 14, folder 9.
  4 "Unionism - The American Way" C.I.O. Poster n.d.
  5 Road Maps n.d.
        Originally located in box 17, folder 2.

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Biographical Note

Scope and Contents

Arrangement

Restrictions

Administrative Information

Related Material

Index Terms

Selected Introductory Bibliography on Harry Cyril Read

Detailed Description of the Collection

Series 1: Professional Correspondence and Subject Files, 1927-1960

Series 2: Writings and Research, 1918-1960, n.d.

Series 3: Printed Material, 1920-1960

Series 4: Personal Correspondence and Financial Records, 1922-1968, n.d.

Series 5: Images, 1917-1957, n.d.

Series 6: Oversize Materials, 1928-1940s

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